the history of yeovil's pubs

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yeovil's beerhouses

 

 

Note: Beerhouses added to this list are included at the bottom of the page - click here

 

Introduction

 

At the risk of being repetitive, I include here much about the Beerhouse Act 1930 from the introduction page after which are listed all the beerhouses I was able to find in the various census records, Directories, and the like - a total of 106.

First imported from the Netherlands in the 1690s gin, in various forms, began to rival beer as the most popular drink in England. During the early 18th century the government permitted unlicensed gin production and at the same time imposed a heavy duty on all imported spirits. This effectively created a market for home-produced cheap gin and thousands of gin-shops sprang up throughout England, a period known as the Gin Craze. The 18th century consequently saw a huge growth in the number of drinking establishments, primarily due to the introduction of gin. By 1740, the production of gin had increased to six times that of beer and, because of its very low price, was extremely popular with the poor of which Yeovil had many.

The Sale of Spirits Act 1750 (commonly known as the Gin Act 1751) was enacted in order to reduce the consumption of spirits that was regarded as one of the primary causes of crime, especially in larger conglomerations such as Bristol and London. The drunkenness and lawlessness created by gin was seen to lead to the ruination and degradation of the working classes. William Hogarth’s prints Gin Lane and Beer Street, both 1751 and shown here, depict the perceived evils of the consumption of gin as a contrast to the merits of drinking beer. Hogarth portrays the inhabitants of Gin Lane as being destroyed by their addiction to the foreign spirit of gin, while those who dwell in Beer Street are seen as happy and healthy, nourished by the native English ale.

In Yeovil, of course, the selling of unlicensed cider was a particular problem and this report of the Petty Sessions of July 1828 is typical ".... were severally convicted in the mitigated penalty of £15 (over £1,000 at 2017's value) each, for retailing cider and allowing it to be drunk on the premises, contrary to law - John Evans, Jesse Hann and Thomas Vagg, all of Yeovil."

In order to combat this apparent national rise in drunkenness, especially amongst the poor, the government enacted the Beerhouse Act 1830. This was seen as an attempt to wean the population off spirits, especially gin, by actively liberalising the regulations and increasing competition in brewing and the sale of beer. According to the Act it was considered "expedient for the better supplying the public with Beer in England, to give greater facilities for the sale thereof, than was then afforded by licenses to keepers of Inns, Alehouses, and Victualing Houses."

Under the 1830 Act any householder who paid rates could apply for a license to sell beer or cider and set up a so-called beerhouse, usually in his own home. The license would also allow him to brew his own beer or cider on his premises. The license cost a one-off payment of two guineas - £2.10 in today’s money but about £160 in today’s value.

The license did not allow the sale of spirits or fortified wines, and any infringement would result in the beerhouse being closed down and the owner heavily fined. Beerhouses were not permitted to open on Sundays. The beer or cider was usually served in jugs or dispensed directly from tapped wooden barrels on a table. It was not uncommon that, because of the high profits involved, the licensee was able to buy the house next door to live in and turn every room in his beerhouse into drinking rooms for customers - see, for example, 33 Brunswick Street below where George Rossiter ran a beerhouse in the 1870's and 1880's but his widow, by 1891, was living next door.

By 1839 there were sixteen Yeovil beerhouses listed in Robson's Directory and a further sixteen by 1842 but I believe, judging by other records, principally the various census returns, that many beerhouses are not included in either directory. By 1840 there were 46,000 beerhouses nationwide and, because it was so easy to buy the license and its cost was so low in comparison to the huge potential profits, the number of beerhouses continued to rise dramatically - to the extent that nearly every street had at least one, if not more, beerhouses. For instance fifteen streets listed below had two or more beerhouses while some streets, notably Hendford, Huish, Middle Street and Park Street each had several. Their longevity in general was extremely short with most only making one or two listings in the census returns and local trade directories. On the other hand, the Rustywell beerhouse must have set some kind of record in pulling pints for a minimum of 67 years - more than many 'proper' pubs. However in many cases the brief nature of some beerhouses was because they were to develop into fully-fledged public houses - for example the Albion Inn, Anchor Inn, Beehive Inn, Bricklayers Arms Inn, Britannia Inn, Hop Vine Inn, Market House Inn and the Seven Stars Inn.

The complexity of the question 'when does a beerhouse become a fully licensed pub?' is generally impossible to answer and, indeed, only one example is known for certain - the Royal Marine only got its full license in 1935. Consequently the line between beerhouse and public house is more than a little vague, which is why so many establishments in the following list might be taken either way.

Eventually new licensing laws, the basis of those in force today, were introduced in 1869 to curb the expansion of beerhouses. The new laws made it much harder to obtain a license and was designed to effectively prevented new beerhouses being created. Nevertheless, those already in existence were allowed to continue and many did not close for many years – that in Rustywell, for instance, was still operating in the 1930’s and indeed some new ones did arise in Yeovil - for instance FW Leach (of the famous Yeovil Leach family of landlords at various establishments through the town) was operating in the 1930's at 10 Higher Kingston. Similarly No 1 Queen Street was operated as a beerhouse between 1895 and 1938 and at 67 Queen Street (see photograph) a beerhouse was in operation between 1901 and 1938.



 

 

Yeovil's Beerhouses

 

The following list of beerhouses has been gleaned from the various census returns and trade directories for Yeovil. The list is not definitive and some in the list may be the same beerhouse but at different dates, while others may not be recorded here at all. Also a few named pubs with very brief life-spans may actually have been beerhouses with names. Where possible, I have indicated which beerhouses developed into named or fully licensed public houses.

The following list is, more or less, in alphabetical order by street.


 

 

For beerhouses in Belmont see Park Street, Belmont & Brunswick Street

 

 

 

1  -  Belmont Street

This beerhouse was in Belmont Street, off Addlewell Lane (then called Frogg Street even though it didn't go near Frogg Mill - that was Mill Lane) and running parallel with Mill Lane, not to be confused with Belmont which was a section of the continuous road between Park Street and Brunswick Street (see below).

Charles Barrett appeared in the Poll Book of 1832 for holding freehold houses (plural) in Belmont although it is not clear if this meant Belmont or Belmont Street. In any case it is not until 1839 that Robson's Directory lists him as a licensed beer retailer in Belmont Street. Charles was born in London about 1790 and by the time of the 1841 census he was still living there with his wife, Elizabeth, and daughter Emily. He gave his occupation as cordwainer but there is no reason to suppose he had stopped selling beer. By the time of the next census in 1851 Elizabeth had died and Charles was living and working as a cordwainer in Middle Street. Living with him was his daughter, Mary, and her husband, William Hann and their son Henry. By the time of the 1861 census Charles was still living in Middle Street with his seamstress daughter Mary Ann Hann, by this time a widow. Charles was now aged 70 and gave his occupation as a wine and spirit traveller. Charles died in the spring of 1864.

Licensees
1832 – Charles Barrett (1832 Poll Book)
1839 – Charles Barrett – Beer Retailer (Robson’s 1839 Directory)
1841 – Charles Barrett – Cordwainer (1841 census)


 

 

2 – Bond Street (1) - Seven Stars Inn

This was the Seven Stars, clearly a very early beerhouse that was probably run by James Foan from its inception. James Foan first appears as licensee in Robson's Directory of 1839 as licensee of the Seven Stars Inn and was still there in 1840. In the 1841 census, he was listed as an inn keeper in Bond Street, with his wife, Rhoda, and three young children. By 1842 James was licensee of the Full Moon Inn in Wine Street and by 1850 was licensee of the Wine Vaults.

Licensees
1835 – Licensee not named (Robson's 1835 Somerset Directory) listed as Seven Stars
1839 – James Foan – Beer Retailer (Robson’s 1839 Directory)
1840 – James Foan (1840 Somerset Gazette Directory) listed as Seven Stars, Bond Street


 

 

3 – Bond Street (2)

It is possible that this was the Seven Stars Inn since James Foan, although its licensee in 1840, is known to have left the Seven Stars by 1842.

Cornelius Hann was born about 1820, the son of gardener James Hann and his wife, Sarah née Paul. The 1841 census lists his birth as in Somerset. In the 1841 census he is listed as a beer seller in Bond Street and, strangely, is listed as first in the household before his parents and siblings, James, Alfred and Matilda. It would appear that, although baptised and appearing in some records as Cornelius, he spent much of his life known as William - unless, of course, there were two hairdressers who also had a sideline as a fishmonger in Hendford, immediately next door to the Three Choughs Hotel, with a wife called Elizabeth and children that included Kate, Emmaline and Henrietta. Elizabeth died in 1882 and Cornelius / William died on 20 March 1893 leaving effects to the value of £328 2s.10d.

Licensees
1841 – Cornelius Hann – Beer Seller (1841 census) pub not named


 

 

4 – Bond Street (3)

There was no Hanna Foot in Yeovil in either the 1871 or 1881 census and it is thought that this entry in Kelly's 1872 Directory may be a misprint for Henry Foot of the Seven Stars Inn, even though Henry was living in Park Street as a newsagent in 1871.

Licensees
1872 – Hanna Foot – Beer Retailer (Kelly's 1872 Directory)


 

 

5 – Bond Street (4)

Bond Street, one of the shortest roads in the town centre, was only laid out and built between 1825 and 1834 by Peter Daniell, so this and the other Bond Street beerhouses were in almost new buildings on an almost new road. This was clearly not the Seven Stars Inn, but a separate beerhouse.

I could find no trace at all of Edward Olding other than the listing in Robson's Directory of 1839.
George Hewlett, on the other hand, was born about 1791 in Somerset. In the 1841 census he was listed as a builder and beer seller in Bond Street, just a couple of houses removed from Cornelius Hann in the beerhouse above. John was shown with his wife, Ann, and their children - Ann, Sophia, George, Thomas and Amelia - but there were too many men called George Hewlett or Hallett to follow him in the records with certainty.

Licensees
1839 – Edward Olding – Beer Retailer (Robson’s 1839 Directory)
1841 – George Hewlett – Builder & Beer Seller (1841 census) pub not named


 

 

6 – Bond Street (5)

This was not the Seven Stars Inn, but a separate beerhouse on the other side of the road.
Isaac Taylor was born in Yeovil around 1786. He was the only known licensee of the Royal Oak 1 in Back Street (today's South Street) in the 1840's and was listed as licensee there in the Beer Houses section of the 1840 Somerset Gazette Directory and is listed in the 1841 census as an innkeeper with his wife, Elizabeth. He is listed again in Pigot's Directory of 1842 but by 1850 he was listed in Hunt & Co's 1850 Directory as running this beerhouse in Bond Street. In the 1851 census, Isaac and Elizabeth were in Bond Street, where Isaac was listed as a shop keeper. He was listed as a retailer of beer in Slater's Directory of 1852/3. By 1861 Isaac and Elizabeth had moved to London and the census lists them as living in Aldersgate with Isaac a 76-year old labourer and Elizabeth a 71-year old dress maker.

Licensees

1850 – Isaac Taylor – Beer Retailer (Hunt & Co's 1850 Directory) not named but in Bond Street
1852 – Isaac Taylor – Retailer of Beer (Slater's 1852/3 Directory)


 

 

7 – Bond Street (6)

This is not thought to be the Seven Stars Inn, but a separate beerhouse on the other side of the road, possibly a later licensee of beerhouse of the previous entry.

William Osmond was born about 1827 at Sutton Bingham, just south of Yeovil, the son of agricultural labourer Samuel Osmond and his wife, Ann. In the 1841 census William was living at home with his parents and siblings. At the age of 14 he too was an agricultural labourer. I couldn't find William in the 1861 census but he certainly wasn't living in Bond Street, however Kelly's Directory listed William as the licensee of this beerhouse in Bond Street in 1866. By 1871 he was living in South Street with his wife, Eliza. He was working as a bricklayer's labourer and she as a dressmaker.

Licensees
1866 – William Osmond – Beer Retailer (Kelly's 1866 Directory)


 

 

8 – Borough

This is not the William Baker that had been running a beerhouse in Back Kingston. Neither was it one of the established pubs of the Borough - Bell Inn 1, Rose and Crown, Greyhound Inn 1, Kings Head Inn, Lyon Inn or the Cross Keys Inn 1 as these had all long since closed. However, based on the position of William Baker's entry in the 1851 census, sandwiched between John Tytherleigh's chemist & druggist shop and Josiah Hammond's ironmongery outlet, the position of this un-named beerhouse is most likely to have been on the site of the previous Greyhound Inn 1.

This William Baker was born in Yeovil on 22 June 1822 the son of Samuel Baker and his wife, Maria née Jeans. William is first listed as licensee in the Borough in the beer retailers section of Hunt & Co's 1850 Directory. In the 1851 census William was described as an inn keeper and was living in the Borough with his wife, Harriett, 13 years his senior. They had two children, Georgiana and Henry, two servants and four lodgers; a sergeant of the Royal Marines with his young wife and baby and a drummer of the Royal Marines. Because of the plethora of William Bakers in Yeovil at the time it was not possible to trace him any further with certainty.

Licensees
1850 – William Baker (Hunt & Co 1850 Directory - Beer Retailers) listed as in Borough
1851 – William Baker – Inn Keeper (1851 census) pub not named but listed as in Borough
1852 – William Baker – Retailer of Beer (Slater's 1852 Directory)


 

 

For beerhouses in Brunswick Street see Park Street, Belmont & Brunswick Street


 

 

9 – Clarence Street (1) / Victoria Place

I'm not sure where Victoria Place was. In the 1861 census it was listed next to the Clarence Street end of Paradise in Huish but there is nothing on the 1886 Ordnance Survey to indicate exactly where. In 1871 George was listed in Clarence Street.

George Sherring Harris was born in Yeovil about 1830. In the 1861 census he was listed as a shop keeper and beer retailer, living with his Bradford Abbas-born wife, Charlotte, in Victoria Place which appears to be at the junction of Clarence Street and Huish, opposite the Heart of Oak. In 1871 they were listed as living at the Westminster Street end of Clarence Street next door to his father, also George Harris - both George and his father described their occupations as living on income from houses. George had probably given up running the beerhouse when he came into money and it may be that the next-listed beerhouse was the same establishment. By 1881 George's father had died and living in his old house at 1 Clarence Street was Henry Edgar of the firm of Petter and Edgar Iron Founders who owned the iron and brass foundry behind Paradise Row / Clarence Street. George and Charlotte still lived at 2 Clarence Street and still lived on income from houses. By 1901 George was a widower, still living on his own means at 2 Clarence Street but now with four of his spinster daughters aged between 39 and 28. George died at the beginning of 1906 aged about 76.

Licensees
1861 – George Sherring Harris – Beer Retailer and Shopkeeper (Kelly's 1861 Directory)
1861 – George S Harris – Shop Keeper & Beer Retailer (1861 census) listed in Victoria Place
1866 – George Sherrin Harris – Beer Retailer (Kelly's 1866 Directory)
1871 – George S Harris – Income from Houses (1871 census) listed in Clarence Street


 

 

10 – Clarence Street (2)

I really don't know about Jesse Marsh - he certainly wasn't in Clarence Street in 1871 as I searched every entry. I also couldn't find him earlier or later either. It may, of course, be the case that he took over George Harris' beerhouse.

Licensees
1872 – Jesse W Marsh – Beer Retailer (Kelly's 1872 Directory)


 

 

11 – Court Ash

Susan Gregory was born in Somerset around 1796. She was listed as a beer retailer in Court Ash in Robson's Directory of 1839 but by the time of the 1841 census she was apparently a widow, still living in Court Ash with her 12-year old daughter Elvia and 11-year old son John, but her occupation was listed as pauper. Susan died in the spring of 1848 aged about 52.

Sarah Brabham was born in Chard around 1798 and in the 1841 was a widowed servant in the same house that Susan Gregory was running her beerhouse. This now, of course, brings into question the validity of Susan's state of pauperism - was Sarah Susan's servant? What's more, it appears that Susan was running her beerhouse up to the day she died because it seems that Sarah took over the beerhouse license on the death of Susan. Susan must therefore have continued to run the beerhouse even though claiming she was a pauper otherwise the beerhouse license would have lapsed. In the 1851 census Sarah was listed as beer house keeper and ten years later in the 1861 census she was listed as beerhouse, butter and store keeper. She was still listed as licensee in Kelly's 1866 Directory but Sarah died in the autumn of 1867 aged about 69.

Licensees
1839 – Susan Gregory – Beer Retailer (Robson’s 1839 Directory)
1850 – Sarah Brabham – Beer Retailer (Hunt & Co's 1850 Directory)
1851 – Sarah Brabham – Beer House Keeper (1851 census)
1861 – Sarah Brabham – Beerhouse, Butter & Store Keeper (1861 census)
1861 – Mrs Sarah Brabham – Beer Retailer (Kelly's 1861 Directory)
1866 – Sarah Brabham – Beer Retailer (Kelly's 1866 Directory)


 

 

12 – Green Quarry

Green Quarry is an area off Mudford Road, on the eastern side and more or less opposite Hollands (now part of Yeovil College campus) and north of Sparrow Road. The eastern row of cottages still survive (see photo) but it is not known which cottage was used as the beerhouse.

Joseph Nelson was born about 1799 at Piddlehinton, Dorset. In the 1841 census he was living in Green Quarry with his wife, Elizabeth, and six-year old daughter, Mary. Joseph was listed as an inn keeper. In 1851 Joseph was licensee of a beerhouse in Hendford with Elizabeth and dressmaker daughter Marie Ann. This beerhouse turned out to be the fledgling London Inn. He was still listed there in Kelly's 1861 Directory but Joseph died in the winter of 1861.

Licensees
1841 – Joseph Nelson – Inn Keeper (1841 census) pub not named


 

 

13 – Hendford (1)

It is not possible to tell where in Hendford this beerhouse was. Similarly, it is not possible to determine if it was just a very short-lived beerhouse or if one of the references below assumed the license after John Ewens left.

John Ewens, was born in Somerset around 1789. Robson's Directory of 1839 lists John as the licensee of one of Yeovil's first licensed beerhouses in Hendford, but he had moved to the Somerset Inn on Preston Road by 1841. This may be an indication of how lucrative this particular beerhouse was. In the 1841 census he is listed as an innkeeper in Preston Road with his wife, Sarah, 21-year old seamstress daughter Sarah, 16-year old tailor's apprentice son James, 11-year old carpenter's apprentice son Samuel and 11-year old daughter Caroline who was a dressmaker's apprentice. Unfortunately for John he died the same year and his widow, Sarah, took over the Somerset Inn license for several years thereafter.

Licensees
1839 – John Ewens – Beer Retailer (Robson’s 1839 Directory)


 


14 – Hendford (2)

As above, it is not possible to tell where in Hendford this beerhouse was. Indeed it may even have been a follow-on licensee to the beerhouse above. At any rate Alfred Slade's tenancy is documented between 1842 and 1850.

Alfred Slade, was born around 1814 in Stoke-sub-Hamdon, 6 miles west of Yeovil. In the 1841 census Alfred was listed living in Wilmington Lane, Yeovil (no, I don't know where that was either - my best guess is Wellington Street, what's yours?) with his glover wife Louisa and their two children. The following year Alfred was licensee of this beerhouse in Hendford as listed in Pigot's Directory of 1842 and was still there eight years later when he was listed as the licensee in Hunt & Co's 1850 Directory. However the following year the 1851 census listed him as an inn keeper at the Crown Inn on Huish with Louisa and their six young children. The last mention of Alfred at the Crown was in Harrison, Harrod & Co's 1859 Directory and by 1861 he was running a public house in Charlton Mackrell.

Licensees
1842 – Alfred Slade – Retailer of Beer (Pigot’s 1842-4 Directory)
1850 – Alfred Slade – Beer Retailer (Hunt & Co's 1850 Directory)



 

 

15 – 28 Hendford (3) - Butchers Arms

This beerhouse, at 28 Hendford, was a completely different establishment to the first two Hendford beerhouses above since George Raymond was licensee from at least 1839 until 1852. Indeed, from its position in the census returns it could only be the Butchers Arms.

George Raymond was born about 1794 at Queen Camel, seven miles northeast of Yeovil. George had been licensee of the White Hart in Stars Lane in 1828 and 1830 which, at the time, was owned by Thomas Cave the brewer of Hendford. George was also listed as a shopkeeper and bacon and cheese factor. Interestingly in the 1840 Somerset Gazette Directory he is also listed as a brewer making him one of only two or three beerhouse keepers actually known to have taken advantage of the brewing part of the Beerhouse Act 1830. Or was he? The 1841 census also lists him as a brewer, living in the same house in Hendford as the commercial brewer Edmund Henning. It may be, therefore, that George Raymond was running what would effectively have been the brewery tap for Henning's brewery. In 1841 George was living with his wife, Mary, and their 14-year old son, George. By 1851 Henning had gone and George gave his occupation as inn keeper and his son George was listed as his assistant. By 1861 George and Mary were living in South Street where George, now aged 66, gave his occupation as cheese dealer etc. By 1871 George and Mary were living in Thomas' Yard off Kingston where George described his occupation as dealer in cheese, malt & hops. By 1881 George had finally retired and, somewhat surprisingly, gave his occupation as retired publican. He and Mary were still living in Kingston but Mary died in the summer of 1881 and George died in the summer of 1883.

Licensees
1839 – George Raymond – Beer Retailer (Robson’s 1839 Directory)
1840 – George Raymond – Brewer (1840 Somerset Gazette Directory)
1841 – George Raymond – Brewer (1841 census) pub not named but in Hendford
1842 – George Raymond – Retailer of Beer (Pigot’s 1842-4 Directory)
1850 – George Raymond – Beer Retailer (Hunt & Co's 1850 Directory) listed in Hendford
1851 – George Raymond – Inn Keeper (1851 census) pub not named but at 28 Hendford Street
1852 – George Raymond – Retailer of Beer (Slater's 1852/3 Directory)


 

 

16 – Hendford (4) - London Inn

From its location in the census records, this beerhouse appears to have been the early London Inn. Indeed, when I spotted that Joseph Melron was a spelling mistake for Joseph Nelson, it was confirmed.

Joseph Nelson was born about 1799 at Piddlehinton, Dorset. In the 1841 census he was running a beerhouse and living in Green Quarry with his wife, Elizabeth, and six-year old daughter, Mary. Joseph was listed as an inn keeper. In 1851 Joseph was licensee of a beerhouse in Hendford with Elizabeth and dressmaker daughter Marie Ann. He was still listed there in Kelly's 1861 Directory but Joseph died in the winter of 1861. Elizabeth took over the license on the death of Joseph and was still there in 1866, being listed in Kelly's Directory of that year.

Licensees
1850 – Joseph Nelson – Beer Retailer (Hunt & Co's 1850 Directory) listed in Hendford
1851 – Joseph Nelson – Inn Keeper (1851 census) pub not named
1852 – Joseph Nelson – Retailer of Beer (Slater's 1852/3 Directory)
1859 – Joseph Melron (sic) (Harrison, Harrod & Co 1859 Directory) listed as London Inn
1861 – Joseph Nelson – Beer Retailer (Kelly's 1861 Directory)
1866 – Mrs Elizabeth Nelson – Beer Retailer (Kelly's 1866 Directory)


 

 

17 – Hendford (5) - Oxford Inn

This was the Oxford Inn in Waterloo Lane. I could find little, well, actually no information on the first two licensees; William Evans and William Bide.

Charles Eaton Pottle was born about 1809 in Yeovil and is first recorded in the 1841 census with his wife, Elizabeth née Russ, and their three children. They were living in Rotten Row and he described his occupation as bricklayer. Rotten Row was the original Reckleford, now Market Street, and near the Pall Inn and Horse Pond - so called from horses being paraded there, especially at times of the fairs. Rotten Row was named after the broad track in Hyde Park, London, still reserved for the exercise of horses. By the following year Charles was licensee of the Case is Altered in Wine Street. Although he was still licensee of the Case is Altered in 1850, by 1851 Charles Pottle, described as a builder and innkeeper in the 1851 census, was running this beerhouse in Wellington Lane - in fact the fledgling Oxford Inn in Waterloo Lane. Charles died in 1867.

Licensees
1835 – Licensee not named (Robson's 1835 Somerset Directory) listed as Oxford, Hendford
1840 – William Evans (1840 Somerset Gazette Directory) listed as Oxford, Hendford
1846 – Edwin Bullock Watts, owner - William Bide, occupier (1846 Tithe Apportionment - 331,
            Inn and Garden, Waterloo Lane)
1852 – Charles Pottle – Retailer of Beer (Slater's 1852/3 Directory)


 

 

18 – Hendford (6)

The only Elizabeth Elswood I could find was the glover living in Vicarage Street in 1841 with her husband Thomas, a tinman (a worker in tin, not the bloke in the Wizard of Oz). However Thomas died in the spring of 1850, aged about 35. It is assumed that Elizabeth either started a beerhouse on the death of her husband or took over the license from him. At any rate she was listed in Hunt & Co's Directory as the licensee of a beerhouse in Hendford in 1850. Elizabeth remarried in 1851 but, not knowing her new married name, I was unable to trace her further.

Licensees
1850 – Elizabeth Elswood – Beer Retailer (Hunt & Co's 1850 Directory) pub not named


 

 

19 – Hendford (7)

I could only find a John Strode living in Sherborne Road in the 1861 census, and he was a dairyman and joiner living with his dairyman father.

Licensees
1861 – John Strode – Beer Retailer and Butcher (Kelly's 1861 Directory)


 

 

20 – Hendford Terrace (8)

This was not the Samuel Taylor who was licensee of the Chough's Tap - he was only born in 1847. However in the 1851 census there is no Samuel Taylor living in Hendford Terrace - strange that.

Licensees
1850 – Samuel Taylor – Beer Retailer (Hunt & Co's 1850 Directory) pub not named
1852 – Samuel Taylor – Retailer of Beer (Slater's 1852/3 Directory)


 

 

21 – Higher Kingston (1) - King's Arms (1)

Not to be confused with the later King's Arms 2 in South Street or the even later King's Arms 3 in Silver Street, this was one of the earliest of the Yeovil beerhouses and was run by William Baker. It was probably a very short-lived establishment as it only appears in the records for a few years.
From its relative position in the 1841 census the King's Arms 1 was located in Back Kingston (today's Higher Kingston) very close, within two or three cottages, to Fiveways crossroads (there was no roundabout then) but it is not possible to tell which side of the road.

William Baker was born around 1800 in Exeter and in the 1841 census he is listed as an inn keeper with his wife, Elizabeth, and their three children living in Higher Kingston. By the time of the 1851 census Elizabeth had died and William, still with his children in Back Kingston, described his occupation as 'contractor of roads, etc.' but he was affluent enough to be employing a live-in housekeeper. It seems likely that Elizabeth had run the beerhouse during the day and William, after spending the day at his 'normal' job, took over during the evenings which was a very common practice in beerhouses. After Elizabeth died it is likely that William had to give up the beerhouse.

This was not the William Baker that was running a beerhouse in the Borough in 1851.

Licensees
1835 – (Robson’s 1835 Directory - Beer Houses) listed as King's Arms, Back Kingston
1839 – William Baker – Beer Retailer (Robson’s 1839 Directory) in Back Kingston
1840 – William Baker (Somerset Gazette 1840 Directory - Beer Houses) listed as King's Arms
1841 – William Baker – Inn Keeper (1841 census) pub not named
1842 – William Baker – Retailer of Beer (Pigot’s 1842-4 Directory) listed in Kingston


 

 

22 – Higher Kingston (2) - Hop Vine Inn / Hop Pole

From its location in the 1861 census, the Hop Vine Inn was located in Higher Kingston close, within five or six cottages, to Fiveways crossroads (there was no roundabout then) but it is not possible to tell which side of the road.

I could find no information on either of the licensees George Copshaw or Walter Newick other than that listed below.

John Phillips, was born about 1829 at Sampford Peverell, Devon. Little is known of his early life but in his later life he seemed to move about the country with great frequency. In 1841, at the age of 14, he was living on his own in Sampford Peverell and working as an agricultural labourer. In September 1849 he married Lydia Knight, ten years his senior and in the 1851 census John was working as a railway labourer and living in Sampford Peverell with Lydia and his younger brother, Richard. In 1852 they had a daughter Elizabeth, born in Sampford Peverell but their next daughter, Susan, was born in 1855 in Odcombe, four miles west of Yeovil. Their next daughter, Mary, was born the following year in Martock, eight miles northwest of Yeovil, and their son, Alfred, was born at Sutton Bingham, four miles south of Yeovil, in 1859. In the 1861 census John was listed as the licensee of the Hop Vine Inn, although Kelly's Directory of 1861 referred to it as the Hop Pole. Ten years on and the 1871 census found John working as a labourer and living with Lydia and Mary in lodgings in High Street, Oakfield, Hampshire. All the other children had left home. In the 1881 census he was on his own, a visitor on the night of the census, lodging in a beerhouse in Midhurst, Sussex, and working as a railway labourer. Lydia, in the meantime, was living at Ryde, Isle of Wight, with her daughter Elizabeth and her husband Francis Serrito. Her occupation was given as a monthly nurse. Lydia died at the age of 74 in 1889 at Ryde. In the 1891 census John was living at Ryde with his daughter Elizabeth (now aged 37 and widowed) and 12-year old granddaughter Minnie. John's occupation was listed as disabled plate layer retired. John died on the Isle of Wight in December 1893, aged 64.

Licensees
1859 – George Copshaw (Harrison, Harrod & Co 1859 Directory) listed as Hop Vine
1861 – John Phillips – Inn Keeper (1861 census) listed as Hop Vine Inn
1861 – John Phillips (Kelly's 1861 Directory) listed as Hop Pole (sic)
1866 – Walter Newick (Kelly's 1866 Directory) listed as Hop Vine  


 

 

23 – Higher Kingston (3)

William Cook Jesty was born about 1847 in Sparkford, nine miles northeast of Yeovil, the son of wheelwright Edward Jesty and his wife Mary née Cook. In the 1861 census the family were living in Higher Kingston, next door to the Hop Vine Inn above. In the 1871 census 24-year old William was still living with his parents and seven siblings and gave his occupation as wheelwright like his father. The whole family was born in Sparkford. Kelly's Directory in both 1872 and 1875 lists William as a beer retailer and the 1872 listing also had him as a shopkeeper but, of course, this may or may not be where he was living with his parents in 1871.

It is most likely that William took on the license of the Hop Vine Inn above, next door to his parent's house, after Walter Newick left - but this, of course, I can't prove.

Licensees
1872 – William Jesty – Beer Retailer and Shopkeeper (Kelly's 1872 Directory)
1875 – William Jesty – Beer Retailer (Kelly's 1875 Directory)


 

 

24 – Higher Kingston (4) - Lamb Inn 2

This very short-lived establishment (not to be confused with the first Lamb Inn) was most likely to have been a simple beerhouse. While the actual location of the Lamb Inn is unknown, it was roughly half-way along Higher Kingston but it is not possible to determine which side of the road.

George Cole, was born about 1823 at Odcombe, just over three miles west of Yeovil. In the 1841 census he was listed as a male servant working at a farm in Lower Odcombe. In September 1846 he married Mary Ann Abbott, known as Ann, from Sandford Orcas in Dorset. Hunt's Directory of 1850 listed George as a beer retailer in Higher Kingston and in the 1851 census he and Ann were living at the Lamb Inn with a son and two daughters; Fanny aged 3, Frank aged 2 and 1-year old Julia Ann. Ann's occupation was dressmaker and George was listed as a brewer and retailer of beer. George's occupation as brewer was quite rare in Yeovil; although the Beerhouse Act 1830 allowed anyone to buy a two-guinea license to open a beerhouse and brew their own beer, only very few beerhouse keepers are known to have been brewers but George Cole was one. In the 1861 census George was listed as the innkeeper at the Lamb Inn and lived there with Ann and their children, now augmented by George aged 7 and one-year old Kate. Some time during the next decade George gave up the license of the Lamb Inn and moved his family to Yeovil Marsh where, in the 1871 census, he was listed as a farmer of 40 acres employing one boy. Living with George and Ann were their children George and Kate and his step-daughter, Emily Abbott. Emily had her mother's maiden name, was listed as George's step-daughter and was aged 21, in other words born four years after George and Ann got married - I'll leave you to ponder on that! Anyway, in 1881 George, still a farmer, was living with Ann and Kate in a farmhouse at Yeovil Marsh. Mary Ann died in December 1887 and in 1891 George was still farming and living on his own with a general domestic servant. George died in December 1893 aged about 70.

The Lamb Inn's license was taken on by John Slade in the 1870's. 

Licensees
1850 – George Cole – Beer Retailer (Hunt & Co 1850 Directory) listed as Higher Kingston
1851 – George Cole – Brewer and Retailer of Beer (1851 census) listed as Back Kingston
1852 – George Cole – Retailer of Beer (Slater's 1852/3 Directory)
1853 – George Cole – Beer Retailer (Slater's 1853 Directory) listed as Reckleford
1861 – George Cole – Inn Keeper (1861 census) listed as Lamb Inn, Back Kingston
1861 – George Cole – Beer Retailer (Kelly's 1861 Directory) listed as Reckleford  


 

 

25 – Higher Kingston (5)

This one is a bit of a mystery and only appears in Kelly's Directory of 1866. There was no William Gibbard registered in Yeovil at any time during the 19th century. There was a 26-year old police constable named William Hubbard living in Reckleford in 1861 but that's as close as I got.

Licensees
1866 – William Gibbard – Beer Retailer (Kelly's 1866 Directory)


 

 

26 – 10 Higher Kingston (6)

This was a very rare 20th century beerhouse - over 100 years after the Beerhouse Act 1830 was enacted. Most cottages in Higher Kingston were demolished in 1969 as part of the hospital redevelopment scheme.

Licensees
1936 – FW Leach (1936 Yeovil Directory) listed as 10 Higher Kingston
1938 – FW Leach (1938 Yeovil Directory) pub not named but listed as 10 Higher Kingston


 

 

27 – Huish Lane (1)

In 1861 Huish Lane was the name of today's Westminster Street although it was much narrower (see Porter's Lane below). This beerhouse was the precursor of the Heart of Oak (today's Westminster)

The first licensee was Edmund Lewis Clark (1799-1862). In Robson's Directory of 1839 he was listed as a beerhouse keeper of Porter's Lane. In the 1841 census Edmund, his wife Phoebe, together with their sons, were listed in Porter's Lane and Edmund gave his occupation as an inn keeper. Pigot's Directory of 1842 listed Edmund as a beerhouse keeper of Porter's Lane. However Edmund was in severe financial difficulty and in 1844 he was declared bankrupt and spent some time in Wilton Gaol, near Taunton. He was described as "late of the Heart of Oak Inn, Porter's alias Hewish-lane, in Yeovil, in the county of Somerset, Beer Salesman, Schoolmaster, &c." It is not known how much time Edmund spent in Wilton but during the 1840s the family moved to London.

Licensees
1839 – Edmund Lewis Clark – Beerhouse Keeper (Robson's Directory) pub not named
1841 – Edmund Lewis Clark – Inn Keeper (1841 census) pub not named
1842 – Edmund Lewis Clark – Beerhouse Keeper (Pigot's Directory) pub not named
1844 – Edmund Lewis Clark – "of the Heart of Oak" (bankrupt and in Wilton gaol)


 

 

28 – 64 Huish (2)

Charles Thomas Lane was born about 1852 in North Perrott, eight miles southwest of Yeovil, the son of farm labourer William Lane and Lavinia, his wife. In the 1861 census Charles was living with his parents and three sisters in South Perrott. On 3 August 1875 Charles married Amelia White of Child Okeford, Dorset, at Ashmore, Dorset and by 1881 they were living at 44 Queen Street, Yeovil. Charles listed his occupation in the census as a tailor and was living with Amelia and their two children, Mabel and Alfred. By 1891 Charles and Amelia had moved to 64 Huish where Charles was listed as a tailor and grocer and Amelia was a tailoress. Mabel, now a dressmaker's apprentice, and Alfred, now a tailor's apprentice, had been joined by siblings Reginald and Ethel. Kelly’s 1895 Directory listed Charles as licensee of a beerhouse at 64 Huish, describing him as beer retailer and shopkeeper. The 1901 census found the family moved again, just around the corner to 67 Queen Street (see photograph at bottom of page) where Charles had established another beerhouse cum shop. He described his occupation as innkeeper and tailor, while Alfred was now a tailor himself and Reginald was a tailor's apprentice. By 1911 Charles' business was expanding and he had moved his family back into Huish where he now occupied both 92 and 94 Huish (the building still survives albeit somewhat altered at ground floor level and is directly opposite the GPO Sorting Office). Both he and Reginald were listed as tailors and Ethel as a dressmaker. By this time Charles was aged 58 and Amelia was 62 and they had been married for 35 years. Charles died in the winter of 1926 and Amelia died in the winter of 1927.

For a photograph of Charles Lane, see beerhouse no. 70 – 67 Queen Street (2) below.

Licensees
1895 – Charles Lane – Beer Retailer & Shopkeeper (Kelly’s 1895 Directory) pub not named
            but at 64 Huish


 

 

29 – Huish (3) -  Beehive Inn

This is the forerunner of the Beehive Inn. James Beare was the first licensee by 1841 and his widow, Joanna, is seen to have taken over the license by 1851. Joanna was born about 1791 in South Cadbury and in the 1851 census was listed as a widowed inn keeper living in Huish with two daughters, Emma and Amelia (both glove sewers), son Hubert (a carpenter) and grandson Sidney. By 1861 Joanna was living on her own and listed in the census as a beer house keeper. Joanna died in 1862.

Licensees
1841 – James Beare – Beer Seller (1841 census) pub not named
1851 – Johanna Beare (widow of James above – Inn Keeper (1851 census)
1861 – Joanna Beare (Widow aged 71) – Beer House Keeper (1861 census) pub not named


 

 

30 – 153 & 155 Huish (3)

Even today this is a small general grocery corner shop cum off-license as seen in the photograph at right. However in the photograph below the sign clearly says 'Charlton Ales on Draught and in Bottles' clearly indicating ale could still be drunk on the premises.

George Henry Cook was born in 1868 at Preston Plucknett, Yeovil, the son of glover John Cook and his wife, Susan. In the 1871 census 3-year old George was living with his parents in Park Street. By 1881 the family were living in Farley Gardens, a small terrace of housing behind the main housing on the south side of Huish, next to the Corporation baths. 12-year old George was employed as a bootmaker and was still living with his parents and three younger siblings. In April 1888 George married Lucy Rogers Tompkins at Yeovil. Lucy was born about 1870 in Yeovil, the daughter of leather dresser Henry Tompkins and his wife, Mary. By 1891 George and Lucy were living in Bond Street with their children; 2-year old Burtram and 1-year old Frederick. George was working as a cabinetmaker and Lucy as a glove machinist. In the 1901 census they were still in Bond Street and had additional children Harry, Edward and Elsie. George was still working from home as a cabinetmaker. By the time of the 1911 census George and Lucy were living at 153 & 155 Huish, on the corner of Orchard Street (seen in the photo here). By this time they had been married 22 years and had five children, four of whom were still living at home. George had put his cabinetmaking skills to good use and described his occupation as 'Undertaker & Picture Framer (also Grocer)'. Son Frederick was a picture framer. By 1914 Kelly's Directory was listing George as a shopkeeper and beer retailer. George died in the autumn of 1919 and Lucy took over the running of the shop and the beerhouse license and was still being listed in the Yeovil Directory in 1936. Lucy died in the spring of 1939.

 



This photograph dates to about 1955 and although the signage above the window at left reads 'Grocery and Off License' the hanging sign reads 'Charlton Ales and Stout on Draught and in Bottles' clearly indicating ale could still be drunk on the premises.

Licensees
1899 – James Rees (see next entry)
1900 – John Cook  – License transfer from James Rees (Western Gazette, 29 June)
1914 – George Cook – Shopkeeper & Beer Retailer (Kelly’s 1914 Directory) pub not named
1936 – Lucy Cook (1936 Yeovil Directory) listed as Orchard House

 

 

 

31 – Kingston

This beerhouse (shown pink on the map below) was confused with the Duke of York by Leslie Brooke, but that was being run by William Fudge at this time. Neither was it the Red Lion Inn nor the White Lion Inn, both of which had landlords in the early 1850's. In fact it was a completely separate beerhouse, located by its position in the 1851 census as the central of five dwellings in Kingston, later to be known as Kingston Villas, that remain to this day as seen in the photograph below.

Thomas Busby was born on 17 April 1803 in Oxfordshire, the son of John Busby and his wife, Ann née Smith. He married Mary Pretty in Yeovil on 11 August 1822. He was still in Yeovil in 1831 when he witnessed the marriage of his brother Mark. The 1841 census listed Thomas and Ann at Park Street with their children; Susan, Marianne, William, Silas, Gaius, Lewis and Dorcas. Thomas was working as a glover.

In 1846 Thomas was recorded in the Poll Book by virtue of holding freehold properties in South Street and Middle Street. Both Hunt's and Pigot's Directories of 1850 listed him as a beerhouse licensee in Kingston and the 1851 census confirms the family were living at Kingston. Thomas worked as a glover's foreman and lived there with Ann and four of the children, including new addition Emma. It appears that shortly after this the family moved to Islington, London, and Thomas died there in 1857.

Thomas Busby was the older brother of Mark Busby who, in 1839, was running a beerhouse in Middle Street.


Photographed in 2012, Thomas Busby's beerhouse was the central one of what were later known as Kingston Villas.

Licensees
1850 – Thomas Busby (Pigot’s 1850 Directory)
1850 – Thomas Busby (Hunt & Co's 1850 Directory - Inns and Public Houses)
1851 – Thomas Busby – Glover's Foreman (1851 census)


 

 

32 – London Road (Sherborne Road) (1) - Sun House Inn

Charles Blake was born about 1799 in Yeovil. He was recorded as a beer retailer in Robson's Directory of 1839 and it is thought, as explained on the Sun House Inn page, that he probably sold the beer brewed at the house called Sun House in his beerhouse, the Sun House Inn. In the 1841 census although Charles was listed as a brick m(aker) his address was certainly given as Sun House Inn, London Road. In the 1851 census he was listed with his wife, Hannah, as an innkeeper at 16 London Road - the Sun House Inn although not named as such. Nevertheless he was recorded as the licensee of the Sun House Inn again in Harrison, Harrod & Co's 1859 Directory. In the 1861 census Charles and Hannah were living next door to the Sun House Inn and Charles gave his occupation as bricklayer. Both Charles and Hannah were aged 62 and living with them was a 13-year old servant, Emma Adams. Hannah died in the spring of 1864 and a couple of months later Charles married Mary Ann Dark, thirty years his junior. In the 1871 census Charles and Mary were living in Kiddles Lane (now Eastland Road) with Mary's mother, also Mary Ann, as housekeeper. Charles was two years older than his mother-in-law! Charles died in the winter of 1875.

 

Sun House Farm in London Road (Sherborne Road) near its junction with Reckleford, the later Sun House Inn.

Licensees
1839 – Charles Blake – Beer Retailer (Robson’s 1839 Directory)
1841 – Charles Blake – Brick M(aker) – (1841 census) listed as the Sun House Inn
1850 – Charles Blake (Hunt & Co 1850 Directory - Beer Retailers) listed in London Road
1852 – Charles Blake (Slater's 1852 Directory - Retailers of Beer) listed at Townsend


 

 

33 – 12 London Road (Sherborne Road) (2)

Samuel Stagg was born about 1786 at Montacute, four miles west of Yeovil. He was listed as a beer retailer in London Road (today's Sherborne Road) in Robson's Directory of 1839 and in the 1841 census he was living there with his wife, Isabella, and their two young daughters, Isabella and Sarah. Samuel gave his occupation as mariner although by this time he was aged about 55 but there is no reason to suggest that he wasn't still running the beerhouse. His wife Isabella died in the autumn of 1846 aged about 50. In the 1851 census Samuel was recorded at 12 London Road and gave his occupation as 'superannuated coast guard £16 per year & lodging house for (word illegible)'. Again there is no reason to suppose that the lodging house was not combined with the beerhouse. Samuel died in the summer of 1862, aged about 76.

Licensees
1839 – Samuel Stagg – Beer Retailer (Robson’s 1839 Directory)
1841 – Samuel Stagg – Mariner (1841 census)
1851 – Samuel Stagg – Lodging House for ??? (1851 census) listed at 12 London Road


 

 

34 – London Road (Sherborne Road)  (3)

The location of this beerhouse is almost known and tantalisingly close to being pinpointed. From the census returns it appears to be next to the turnpike gate on the London Road and close to Jenning's Buildings, later known as New Prospect Place - a long terrace of small cottages, now demolished and the land used as allotments. They ran from close to the White Horse 2 to the Royal Marine and were described as "simply huts with no foundations and originally having earth floors". Even so they were not demolished until 1907. I thought at first this might be one of the above-mentioned pubs but the landlord is already known for the White Horse and I don't think the Royal Marine was there much before the 1870's. The turnpike gate is the biggest clue, but I'm not sure exactly where it was, other than spanning the London Road, as it isn't shown on any of the early maps I have. My best guess for this beerhouse was actually on the London Road (as described in more than one census) close to the junction with Lyde Road.

John Green, the only known licensee, was born about 1791 in Beaminster, Dorset and on 5 June 1815 married Mary Welham. He was listed as a beer retailer in London Road (today's Sherborne Road) in Hunt & Co's Directory of 1850. In the 1851 census he was listed as a 63-year old farmer and wheelwright with his wife, Mary, and a house servant living next door to the Goar Knap Turnpike Gate (although in sparsely-populated 1841 'next door' could be quite a way away). John gave his occupation as carpenter. In the 1851 census John and Mary were still on London Road and were the last dwelling in that part of the census, there was no mention of the turnpike gate but a note on the page reads "The end of Towns End and Sun House or London Road". (Sun House was at the other end of Towns End.) John, now aged 63, described his occupation as farmer and wheelwright. In the following 1861 census John and Mary were still in the last house on London Road - by now called Sherborne Road - although the Goar Knap Turnpike Gate had reappeared. John now described his occupation as 'carpenter and occupier of 30 acres land employing one man'. John died in the autumn of 1867.

Licensees
1850 – John Green – Beer Retailer (Hunt & Co's 1850 Directory) pub not named


 

 

35 – London Road (Sherborne Road)  (4)

It would be nice to think that George Connock was related to Robert Connick who ran the Sun House Inn until his death in 1866. Unfortunately I could find no records whatsoever for George, other than this reference to him as a beer retailer on the London Road in Kelly's Directory of 1875.

Licensees
1875 – George Connock – Beer Retailer (Kelly's 1875 Directory) listed in London Road


 

 

36 – London Road (Sherborne Road)  (5)

Unfortunately this is the only reference to the beerhouse, so its exact location cannot be determined.

Thomas Locock was born about 1828 at Stoke sub Hamdon, about six miles west of Yeovil, the son of glover James Locock and his wife, Elizabeth. In the 1841 census Thomas was living with his parents and four sisters in Vicarage Street and, at the age of 13, was working as a glover. In October 1848 he married Martha Pike Hinton at Yeovil and in the 1861 census Thomas and Martha were living in Vicarage Street with their two daughters, Emily and Elizabeth. Thomas gave his occupation as glove cutter. In Kelly's Directory of 1866 Thomas was listed as a beer retailer in this London Road beerhouse. Martha died in the summer of 1868 and Thomas remarried the following spring. By 1871 Thomas, his new wife Jane and his two daughters were living at the Royal Standard 1 in Huish where Thomas was listed as glover and publican. Thomas remained publican of the Royal Standard until his death at the age of 67 at the beginning of 1895. Following his death Jane took over the license of the Royal Standard for a year or two. She died in 1899.

Licensees
1866 – Thomas Locock – Beer Retailer (Kelly's 1866 Directory)  


 

 

37 – London Road (Sherborne Road)  (6)

Now (April 2015) determined that this was the Sun House Inn.

Mark Langdon was born in Bradford Abbas, just south of Yeovil, about 1836, the son of flax worker George Langdon and his wife, Ruth. In the 1841 census Mark was living at Bradford Abbas with his parents and five siblings. By 1851 the family had moved to Stoford, just south of Yeovil, and Mark was working as an agricultural labourer. In 1857 Mark married Sherborne-born Emily Pamela Garrett in Yeovil and in the 1861 census Mark and Emily, together with baby son George and Emily's brother and his wife were at No 3 Newton Farm House where Mark worked as a mason. The family moved to Bond Street and in the 1871 census were listed next door to the Seven Stars Inn with new son, Fred, and Mark's widowed mother, Ruth. Mark was working as a labourer, Emily as a seamstress and 13-year old George was a carpenter's apprentice. The following year Mark was listed as a beer retailer in London Road in Kelly's Directory - but this is the only reference to this venture as by 1881 Mark, Emily and new son Lyndall were living on Reckleford at the junction with Mary Street and Mark, once again, was occupied as a mason. They were still there ten years later when Mark listed his occupation as a builder. Living with him and Emily were two sons, Frederick and Ernest, daughter Alice and grandson Fred. In the 1901 census Mark was listed on Reckleford Hill working as a stone mason and Emily was absent on census night but his two grandsons, George and Fred were present. Mark died in the spring of 1904 aged about 68 and Emily died in the spring of 1912 aged 74.

Licensees
1872 – Mark Langdon – Beer Retailer (Kelly's 1872 Directory) listed in London Road
1872 – Mark Langdon – "of the Sun House Inn" licence renewed (Petty Sessions, September)


 

 

38 –   Market Street (1) - Market Street Inn

Although it doesn't name it in any of the records in which James Chaffey appears, this must have been the Market Street Inn.

James Chaffey was born about 1837 in Yeovil and was married to Louisa. The two records of him running a beerhouse in Market Street occur in Kelly's Directory of 1872 and 1875. In the 1881 census, the only other record in which I could find him, James Chaffey, with his wife Louisa and son James, was working as a tanner and living at the Market Street Inn, at this time being run by William Ramsdale. In 1891 Louisa and James were living in South Western Terrace immediately next door to the Alexandra Inn. Louisa described herself as 'living on my own means' and was listed as married but James was conspicuous by his absence. The exact situation was replicated in the 1901 census. Louisa died in the summer of 1903 but what became of James is a complete mystery.

Licensees
1872 – James Chaffey – Beer Retailer and Shopkeeper (Kelly's 1872 Directory) in Market Street
1875 – James Chaffey – Beer Retailer (Kelly's 1875 Directory) listed in Market Street


 

 

39 – 22 Market Street (2)

From its location in the census returns, this beerhouse would have been roughly where Vincent Street (built later and now Central Road by Palmer's fish & chip shop) joins Market Street.

John Peaty was born about 1820 at Compton, just east of Yeovil. In the 1851 census he was listed living in Sparrow Lane with his Yetminster-born wife, Mary, and two sons; John and William. By 1861 he had moved his family to Rotten Row (today's Market Street) where he worked as a carpenter. It appears that the family were still there in 1871 (the census enumerator listed both today's Reckleford and Market Street as just Reckleford) but at this time John gave his occupation as grocer. Kelly's Directory of 1875 lists him as a beer retailer and it is likely this was the case in 1871. In the 1881 census John and Mary, with their 2-month old granddaughter and a domestic servant were listed at the same address, this time listed as 22 Market Street. John, now aged 63, gave his occupation as dairyman so may have given up the beerhouse license by this time. John died in 1885 and Mary died the following year.

 Licensees
1875 – John Peaty – Beer Retailer (Kelly's 1875 Directory)


 

40 – 20 / 22 Market Street (3)

I initially thought that this was clearly the same beerhouse as listed above however between the time of John Peaty in 1875 above, and Charles Lewis in 1891 here, there was a considerable difference - Vincent Street had been built at the location. As a consequence I believe that John Peaty's beerhouse above had been demolished, and that this beerhouse-cum-grocery was the new building on the corner of Market Street and Vincent Street shown in the photograph below.

Charles Lewis was born about 1827 at Milborne Port, the son of glover George Lewis and his wife, Ann. The family had moved to Yeovil by 1841 when the census lists 15-year old Charles living with his parents and six siblings at Reckleford. Charles married in the spring of 1849 and in the 1851 census he is listed with his Yeovil-born wife, Mary Ann Minchington, living at Park Street where both gave their occupation as glover. By 1861 Charles was a glover's foreman and was living with Mary in Dampier's Cottages, in Reckleford near the junction with Goldcroft. They now had two daughters; Mary Louisa and Sophia, and a baby son Matthew. In the 1871 census Charles and his family were listed living at Roping Path where he gave his occupation as foreman at a gloving factory. Children Matthew and Mary were still living at home and had been joined by John, Emma and Elizabeth. Little changed during the next ten years except only Elizabeth and new daughter Ada Kate were living with Charles and Mary. By 1891 however quite a bit had changed; Charles and Mary, with Ada, had moved to 22 Market Street where Charles now described his occupation as grocer and beerhouse keeper. He was also listed as a beer retailer and shopkeeper in Kelly's Directory of 1895. Mary died in the autumn of 1897 and in the 1901 census Charles, now aged 74, had Ada and her husband, John Cridge, and baby Charles living with him. Charles and John Cridge was both listed as grocer and beer retailer. The only anomaly is that the census listed them at 20 Market Street rather than 22 as previously. This was repeated in 1911 so either the street was renumbered (a not uncommon occurrence in Yeovil) or Charles and John moved their beerhouse next door. The 1911 census actually stated that Charles and John were jointly shopkeepers and grocers but it is not known if they were still selling beer as a sideline. Charles died in the winter of 1918 aged about 91.

 

This photograph looks back down Market Street and is taken from its junction with Vincent Street at left. With the building of the Quedam centre this part of Vincent Street became an extension of Central Road - in other words the photographer has got his back to Palmer's fish restaurant. Charles Lewis' beerhouse-cum-grocery was the new building on the corner of Market Street and Vincent Street shown here at left. It was demolished as part of the Quedam project.

Licensees
1891 – Charles Lewis – Grocer & Beerhouse Keeper (1891 census) pub not named but listed
            at 22 Market Street
1895 – Charles Lewis – Beer Retailer & Shopkeeper (Kelly’s 1895 Directory) pub not named
            but listed at 22 Market Street
1901 – Charles Lewis – Grocer & Beer Retailer (1901 census) pub not named but listed at
            20 Market Street
1901 – John Cridge – Grocer & Beer Retailer (1901 census) son-in-law in partnership with
            Charles Lewis
1911 – Charles Lewis – Shopkeeper and Grocer (1911 census) listed at 20 Market Street
1911 – John Cridge – Shopkeeper and Grocer (1911 census) son-in-law in partnership with
            Charles Lewis
1936 – John Cridge (1936 Yeovil Directory) listed as 20 Market Street
1938 – John Cridge (1938 Yeovil Directory) pub not named but listed as 20 Market Street


 

 

41 – Middle Street (1)

From the relative position of the entry in the 1841 census, Mark Busby may have been an earlier licensee of the Phoenix Inn although it appears more likely that this beerhouse was closer to Union Street.

Mark Busby was born on 12 April 1807 at Combe, Oxfordshire, the son of John Busby and his wife Ann née Smith. He was the younger brother of Thomas Busby who, in 1850, was running a beerhouse in Kingston. On 14 November 1831 he married Miriam Griffin in Yeovil, witnessed by his brother Thomas. In 1839 Mark was listed in Robson's Directory as licensee of a beerhouse in Middle Street and in the 1841 census he was still in Middle Street and gave his occupation as glover, although there is no reason to suppose he had given up the beerhouse especially since Pigot's Directory listed him as a retailer of beer in 1842. He was living there with Miriam and their children; Emily, Edwin and Elizabeth. By 1851 the family had moved to Vicarage Street. Mark gave his occupation as glove cutter and Miriam as glover. Emily and Edwin had left home but Elizabeth had been joined by siblings Miriam, Thomas, Frederick and baby Henrietta. The 1861 census found the family living in Belmont, Mark was a leather glover. He died in the autumn of 1867 aged about 60 and Miriam went to live with her daughter at Rustywell.

Licensees
1839 – Mark Busby – Beer Retailer (Robson’s 1839 Directory)
1841 – Mark Busby – Glover (1841 census)
1842 – Mark Busby – Retailer of Beer (Pigot's 1842 Directory)


 

 

42 – Middle Street (2)

From the relative position of John Best's entry in the 1851 census this was, most likely, the same beerhouse as above. Unfortunately this cannot be proved to be the case, so I've kept it as a separate entry.

John Best was born about 1803 in Yeovil. In 1850 Hunt & Co's Directory listed him as a beer retailer in Middle Street but in the 1851 census John gave his occupation as fellmonger & gaiter maker (a fellmonger was a dealer in hides and skins who also recycled inedible animal parts for glue, fertiliser, offal, horn, bone, guts etc. Basically, he ran the "knacker's yard" - just the sort of place that would have given Middle Street a reputation as a "stinking place"). By 1861 John had relocated his family to Bermondsey, London, where he worked as a leather dresser.

Licensees
1850 – John Best – Beer Retailer (Hunt & Co's 1850 Directory) pub not named  


 

 

43 – Middle Street (3)

Because of its location in the 1861 census this beerhouse (marked 'A' on the map and arrowed in the photograph below) is one of the very few beerhouses whose location can be precisely pinpointed - on the eastern side of the entrance to Dean's Court, off Middle Street, directly opposite the George Hotel and two doors along from the Castle Hotel. At about the same time this operated as a beerhouse Dean's Court, which was essentially slum housing for the very poor, became notorious for the repeated outbreaks of typhoid fever because all eight properties shared a common privy so close to the well supplying drinking water for the Court that the privy actually drained into the well. Not nice.

Thomas Haywood / Hayward was born in Yeovil about 1833 the son of glover John Hayward and his wife, Maria. In the 1841 census Thomas was living in Back Street (today's South Street) with his parents and five siblings. By 1851 the family were living in Willmington Lane (possibly an early name for Salthouse Lane) and Thomas, now aged 15, gave his occupation as tailor. He now had eight siblings. In the 1861 census Thomas and his new Charminster-born wife, Sarah Ann, were living in Middle Street and described his occupation as tailor and beerhouse keeper. Sarah was living in Middle Street in the 1871 census and described her occupation as greengrocer. Thomas was conspicuous by his absence, but there were five lodgers. Whether or not the greengrocery had a beer barrel sat on a table in one corner can only be guessed at.

We actually have a very good description of Thomas Hayward from the record of his admission to Dorchester Prison on 12 October 1878 for being drunk and disorderly. His parish was Yeovil, trade was tailor, age 43, height 5ft 5½ins, hair dark brown, eyes light hazel, complexion rather ruddy, married, 3 children, hair thin top of head, (word illegible) under left shoulder blade, large veins inside left leg, scar below the knee same leg, 1st time. The sentence was not recorded.

The last record I found for Thomas was the 1891 census. He and Sarah were still living in Middle Street, his occupation was tailor and hers was shopkeeper.

 



This rare sepia-toned photograph of about 1875 looks down Middle Street and shows the Castle Inn at extreme left with Thomas Haywood's beerhouse arrowed. The original narrow entrance to Union Street is seen right of centre.

Licensees
1861 – Thomas Haywood – Tailor & Beer House Keeper (1861 census) pub not named


 

 

44 – Middle Street (4)

From its position in the 1851 census this beerhouse was on the north side of Middle Street, roughly halfway between Union Street and Bond Street.

Jacob Woolmington was recorded as the licensee of the John Bull in Middle Street between 1839 and 1842. He was born about 1815 in Stoford, just south of Yeovil. In the 1841 census he was listed as innkeeper in last house in Vicarage Street (the John Bull) with his wife, Elizabeth, and their children Edwin, Emily and Gertrude. In 1851 he was recorded in the census as being a glover and innkeeper of a beerhouse in Middle Street with Elizabeth and three young daughters; Emily Jane, Sarah and Harriett. This beerhouse, at one time, was thought to have been the John Bull, but must have been a separate establishment because the John Bull was named as such and had another licensee, Thomas Walters, in 1850 and was being run by his widow, Jane Walters, in 1851. By 1861 the Woolmington family had moved to Bond Street where Jacob was listed as a leather glove cutter, Sarah was a dressmaker and the other two girls were both leather glove makers. In 1871 Jacob, Elizabeth and daughter Sarah were still in Bond Street. I lost them in the records after this date.

Licensees
1850 – Jacob Woolmington – Beer Retailer (Hunt & Co's 1850 Directory) listed in Middle Street
1851 – Jacob Woolmington – Glover & Innkeeper (1851 census) pub not named


 

 

45 – 98 Middle Street (5) - New Inn

This was one of only three beerhouses listed in Whitby's 1882 Yeovil Almanack Advertiser. It was the New Inn, although by 1881 Elizabeth Lydiatt was living in South Street.

John Lydiatt was born in Kineton, Warwickshire about 1814 but I first encountered him in the 1871 census in which he was listed as a glazier and innkeeper in Middle Street. He was aged 57 and his wife, Elizabeth, was 44 and born in Hardington Mandeville. Their two children, Susan and Albert, were living with them. John was listed as a beer retailer in Kelly's 1872 Directory but he died in the spring of 1874. Elizabeth then took on the license and was listed as beer retailer in Kelly's Directory of 1875 and Whitby's 1882 Yeovil Almanack Advertiser in which she was listed as licensee at 98 Middle Street (the New Inn) although in the 1881 census Elizabeth was actually listed as a shopkeeper at 48 South Street. By 1901 Elizabeth was living as a dressmaker in Mortlake, Surrey, with her shopkeeper son Albert and his family. In 1911 she was living with her widowed daughter Susan and her children in Tolworth, Surrey.

Licensees
1871 – John Lydiatt – Glazier & Innkeeper (1871 census) pub not named, listed in Middle Street
1872 – John Lydiatt – Beer Retailer (Kelly's 1872 Directory)
1875 – Mrs Elizabeth Lydiatt – Beer Retailer (Kelly's 1875 Directory)
1882 – Mrs Elizabeth Lydiatt – Beer Retailer (Whitby's 1882 Yeovil Almanack Advertiser) listed
            at 98 Middle Street


 

 

46 – Middle Street (6)

From its position in the 1841 census this beerhouse appears to have been the last house in Middle Street at the junction with Vicarage Street and on the opposite corner to the John Bull Inn. The building was later demolished and the present building, that originally housed Belben's 6½d Bazaar and is now a betting shop, replaced it.

Thomas Phillips was born about 1797 but not in Somerset. He is listed as a beer retailer in Middle Street in Robson's Directory of 1839 ands as an innkeeper in Middle Street in the 1841 census at which time he was living with his 18-year old daughter Caroline and 16-year old cordwainer son, John. They were not in Yeovil in the following census and because of the sheer number of men called Thomas Phillips at the time it was not possible to trace them further.

Licensees
1839 – Thomas Phillips – Beer Retailer (Robson’s 1839 Directory) listed in Middle Street
1841 – Thomas Phillips – Innkeeper (1841 census) pub not named but listed in Middle Street


 

 

47 – Middle Street (7)

The actual location of this Middle Street beerhouse is unknown.

Frederick Squibb was born about 1823 at Rampisham, Dorset. In the 1851 census he was living at Belmont with his wife, Louisa, and children Harriet and William. Frederick gave his occupation as carpenter and Louise's was glover. By the time of the 1861 census Frederick had moved his family to Middle Street where he was still listed as a carpenter although Kelly's Directory of the same year listed him as a beer retailer. His family had now expanded to include Henrietta, Thomas, Amanda and Sidney. By 1871 the family had moved again and were living in South Street. The family now expanded by the addition of Harry, Annie and Kate and Frederick still worked as a carpenter.

Licensees
1861 – Frederick Squibb – Beer Retailer (Kelly's 1861 Directory)


 

 

48 – Middle Street (8)

The actual location of this Middle Street beerhouse is unknown. The Foans were a family with many connections to the licensed trade; in the latter part of the 19th century James Foan, Frederick Foan and James W Foan ran the Wine Vaults for many years and James Foan ran the Full Moon, both establishments in Wine Street.

Charles Foan was born in Yeovil about 1788 and first appears in the records in the Poll Book of 1832 by virtue of owning a freehold house, Penn-field. He was listed as a Middle Street beer retailer in Robson's Directory of 1839 but in the 1841 census he was living at Pen Field House on London Road with his wife, Mary, and six of their children. In the 1851 census he was listed as a glover and grocer in Middle Street although his daughter was described as a grocer's daughter, giving emphasis to grocer rather than glover? Possibly selling beer as a sideline? Charles Foan died in the spring of 1859, aged about 71.

Thanks to Philip Harris of Australia for getting in touch with me and sharing the following -

"I am a descendant of Charles Foan and was not aware of his pub businesses although not surprised as it runs in the family with his son, Daniel Foan, arriving in Adelaide, Australia in 1851 and applying for a Publican's License. My mother Margaret née Foan (deceased) and her sister, Mary, are the last of the Foan line descended from Daniel."



Licensees
1839 – Charles Foan – Beer Retailer (Robson’s 1839 Directory)


 

 

49 – Middle Street (9)

Another one of the Foan clan, similarly the actual location of this Middle Street beerhouse is unknown.

Henry Foan was born about 1799 in Yeovil and may have been the brother of Charles Foan above although it is most unlikely that Henry took over Charles' beerhouse as he had left it by 1841. In the 1841 census Henry was listed as a glover living in Middle Street with his wife, Sarah, boys Charles, Henry, and Emmanuel, aged 18, 14 and 8 respectively and girls Jean, Sylvena and Amelia aged 16, 10 and 1 respectively. Charles and Henry were listed as glovers like their father. Hunt & Co's Directory of 1850 listed him as a Middle Street beer retailer but the 1851 census, although listing him still in Middle Street, gave his occupation as a glove cutter. Henry died in 1856.

Licensees
1850 – Henry Foan – Beer Retailer (Hunt & Co’s 1850 Directory) listed in Middle Street.


 

 

50 – Middle Street (10)

And yet another one of the Foan clan and, again, the actual location of this Middle Street beerhouse is unknown.

There are very few records pertaining to John who was born in Yeovil about 1807. In 1851 the census lists a gardener John Foan with his glove sewer wife, Martha, living in Rotten Row (today's Market Street) and Slater's Directory of 1852 lists him as a retailer of beer in Middle Street. That's it.

Licensees
1852 – John Foan – Retailer of Beer (Slater’s 1852 Directory) listed in Middle Street.


 

 

51 – Middle Street  (11) - South Western Arms

Based on its position in the 1861 census this must have been the South Western Arms.

Levi Ridout was born at Bradford Abbas, just south of Yeovil, around 1807. In Kelly's Directory of 1861 he was listed as a beer retailer and carpenter in Sherborne Road - although where Middle Street and Sherborne Road meet has often been a moot point. In the census of the same year he was living in Middle Street at such a location - midway between the Railway Inn and the Elephant and Castle - that it could only have been the South Western Arms. I could find no further references to Levi at all.

Licensees
1861 – Levi Ridout – Beer Retailer and Carpenter (Kelly's 1861 Directory) in Sherborne Road
1861 – Levi Ridout – Builder (1861 census) listed in Middle Street


 

 

52 – Middle Street / Townsend (12)

This beerhouse, based on its position in the 1871 census, lay between the South Western Arms and the Elephant and Castle Hotel as shown on the map, marked 'B'.

William Skinner was born in Exmouth, Devon about 1819. In the 1851 census he was living at Bishops Hull, Somerset, with his Tiverton-born wife Jane, children Ellen and William and his widowed father Robert, a retired house servant. William gave his occupation as a railway labourer. During the following decade he moved his family to Yeovil, presumably following a railway career for in the 1861 census he was working as a railway inspector, presumably at the newly-opened Yeovil Town Railway Station. At this time he was living in Middle Street, two houses away from Commercial Buildings in Middle Street. Commercial Buildings were where the William Dampier now stands and it is likely that William lived in the first house next to the Railway Inn. Living with him was Jane and three children - Emma, Walter and Frederick with no sign of Ellen and William. Within a year of two the family moved along the road to a building between the South Western Arms and the Elephant & Castle Hotel.

Here William opened a beerhouse and is mentioned as a beer retailer in Kelly's Directory between 1866 and 1875. I would assume that Jane pretty much ran the beerhouse as during this period William must have been very busy setting up a new enterprise. Having worked for many years on the railways, William Skinner obviously appreciated the importance of coal to the new transport system. From working as a railway inspector in 1861 at the newly opened Yeovil Town Railway Station, seen in the photograph below, by 1871 he was listed in the census as a coal merchant and cannily located his coal yard, also seen in the photograph below, adjacent to the railway goods yard. By 1881 William, Jane and son Frederick had moved to 9 South Western Terrace, opposite their coal yard. Both William and Frederick were listed as coal merchants and Frederick was to continue running the coal yard business after his father's death in 1888 at the age of about 69.


This sketch from Summerhouse Hill overlooking the new Yeovil Town Railway Station was made about 1860 at exactly the time career railway man William Skinner was working as a railway inspector.

 

William Skinner's beerhouse arrowed in this sepia toned photograph of about 1890. The right hand side of the photograph is dominated by the Elephant and Castle and just left of centre the two-storey building with the large projecting sign is the Southwestern Arms.

 

This photograph was taken about 1910 and looks along Station Road. Having worked for many years on the railways, William Skinner obviously appreciated the importance of coal to the new transport system. From working as a railway labourer in 1851 and rising to become a railway inspector in 1861 at the newly opened Yeovil Town Railway Station, seen here at centre, by 1871 he was listed in the census as a coal merchant and cannily located his coal yard, seen here at right, adjacent to the railway goods yard. At left is the Alexandra Hotel. At the time of this photograph the coal yard was run by William's son, Frederick Skinner.

Licensees
1866 – William Skinner – Beer Retailer (Kelly's 1866 Directory) listed at Townsend
1872 – William Skinner – Beer Retailer and Coal Dealer (Kelly's 1872 Directory)
1875 – William Skinner – Beer Retailer (Kelly's 1875 Directory)


 

 

53 – Middle Street / Towns End (13)

So, where does Middle Street end and Sherborne Road begin? Today it seems that the junction with Wyndham Street marks the boundary but earlier, certainly in the 1850's, demarcation was less clear and the area as well as the road was called Townsend or Town's End. From its relative position in the 1851 census, William Fear's beerhouse was most likely to have been in one of the small terrace of shops on the northern side of the road between Wyndham Street and the junction of Reckleford and Sherborne Road.

William Fear was born in Sherborne, Dorset, in 1822 and baptised on 21 December. He was the son of labourer Abraham Fear and his wife Harriet. In the 1851 census he was listed as a Middle Street inn keeper, living with his Barwick-born wife Harriett and children Samuel aged 3, Wilamina aged 2 and Melina aged 1. Also present were his pauper mother-in-law, Martha Lewis, and a pauper aunt. There were also four lodgers. In the 1861 census the family were living on Sherborne Road. Barwick-born Harriett had become Stoford-born Ann (clearly she was born either Harriett Ann Lewis or Ann Harriett Lewis - Barwick and Stoford being the same parish) and, in addition to Samuel, Wilhelmina and Melina, there were Sarah, Susannah, Anna, William, Patrick and Richard - it had clearly been a busy and productive decade for Harriett / Ann. Her mother, Martha Lewis, was also still living with them. William now gave his occupation as gardener. By 1871 the entire family had moved to Wellington Street. William was now working as a farm labourer and Harriett / Ann had reverted to being called Harriett. Her mother was still living with them and the children remaining at home were increased by Henry and Edwin. I lost track of them after that.

Licensees
1850 – William Fear – Beer Retailer (Hunt & Co's 1850 Directory) listed at Townsend
1851 – William Fear – Inn Keeper (1851 census) pub not named


 

 

A Note on the Pubs of Park Street, Belmont and Brunswick Street

Old Yeovilians will recall the four pubs in Park Street, Yeovil's longest (and many would say roughest) road, because that was all that remained in living memory after a couple shut and two became lodging houses in the early 20th century. However there had been, for much of the 19th century, nine pubs in this road (which comprised Park Street, Belmont and Brunswick Street). These were (in alphabetical order) Britannia Inn 1, Cross Keys 2, Dolphin Inn, Globe Inn, Glovers Arms 1, Golden Lion, Rifleman's Arms, Swan Inn 2 and the Volunteer Inn.

Park Street was laid out and built by Peter Daniell in the early 1830's so naturally most, if not all, of these pubs started out as beerhouses in the wake of the Beerhouse Act 1830.

Beerhouses Park Street 1, 3, 5 and 7 are seen as beerhouses in addition to the established Park Street pubs, as are Belmont 3 and Brunswick Street 3 and, possibly, 2.

In conclusion, during the 19th century Park Street / Belmont / Brunswick Street had nine named pubs and a minimum of an additional six beerhouses - a total of fifteen drinking establishments. Now that's what I call a pub crawl.


 

 

54 – 11 Park Street (1)

By 1895, the date of this record, Park Street had been completely renumbered. This building, No 11, would have been between the Globe Inn (at 2 Park Street) and the Rifleman's Arms Inn (at 24 Park Street). The only James Warr I could find in the records was a carter on a farm and lived in Mudford Road in both 1891 and 1901, so it probably wasn't him but there was no other man of that name in Yeovil around that time.

Licensees
1895 – James Warr – Beer Retailer (Kelly’s 1895 Directory) pub not named but at 11 Park Street


 

 

55 – Park Street (2) - Rifleman's Arms

John Hookey Jones was born about 1804 at Shapwick, Somerset. He first appears in the records in the 1841 census in a building that, based on its relative position in the census returns of 1841 to 1871 inclusive, could only be the fledgling Rifleman's Arms. In 1841 John, his Yeovilton-born wife Elizabeth and children - Ann, Emily and John - were living here where they were to stay until shortly before John's death in 1876.

Although John clearly started the Rifleman's Arms Inn (since he was living there from at least 1841 to 1875) it is not known when. His occupation in 1841 was glover leather dresser although, of course, this would not have precluded him running a beerhouse from this time. In 1851 he and Elizabeth were both simply listed as glovers but it is the 1861 census that hints at the beerhouse - his occupation is clearly listed as glover leather dresser but scrawled above this is what appears to be 'grocer innkeeper'. Kelly's Directory of 1866 clearly lists him as the licensee as does the 1871 census.

Licensees
1861 – John Jones – Glover Leather Dresser / Grocer Innkeeper (1861 census) pub not named
1866 – John Jones – Beer Retailer (Kelly's 1866 Directory)
1871 – John Jones – Inn Keeper (1871 census) pub not named


 

 

56 – Park Street (3)

This beerhouse was four doors along from the Rifleman's' Arms Inn and is shown arrowed in the photograph below.

Thomas Pittard was born about 1816 at Brympton d'Evercy, just west of Yeovil. In the 1841 census he was listed as a bookseller living with his wife Mary Ann, a straw bonnet maker, in Victoria Buildings - a long row of cottages for poor workers, mainly glovers, near Dodham Brook.

In the 1851 census Thomas and Mary Ann, with son John plus a niece and nephew, had moved to Park Street, she was sill working as a bonnet maker while Thomas listed his occupation as bookseller and tea dealer. He was clearly selling more than just tea as the following year he was listed as a retailer of beer in Slater's Directory of 1852. Mary died in 1859 and in the 1861 census Thomas was working as a leather glover and son John was a carpenter. Also living at the house were four lodgers. I lost track of Thomas in the records after this.

Licensees
1852 – Thomas Pittard – Retailer of Beer (Slater's 1852/3 Directory)


 

 

57 – Park Street (4) - Swan Inn 2

Although it cannot be proved conclusively, judging by the relative position in the census records, this was almost certainly the Swan Inn 2.

Jane Russ was born in Yeovil around 1791. She first appeared in the 1841 census living in Park Street as a 48-year old glove sewer with her two daughters; Mary aged 12 and Jane aged 8. She was listed in Pigot's Directory of 1842 as a retailer of beer but had probably been running a beerhouse before this, possibly since the death of her husband. Indeed she was still licensee in 1850 when listed in Hunt & Co's Directory and was probably running the beerhouse in 1851 when, still in Park Street, she and daughter Jane gave their occupation as glover and Mary as dressmaker. They also had a pauper lodger. By 1861 Mary had married glove cutter Charles White and Jane, simply described as a 73-year old widow, was living with them at Reckleford. In 1871 Jane was one of nine elderly widows living as an annuitant in the Corporation Almshouse in South Street on the corner with Union Street. Jane died in the winter of 1874, aged about 83.

Licensees
1842 – Jane Russ – Retailer of Beer (Pigot’s 1842-4 Directory)
1850 – Jane Russ - Beer Retailer (Hunt & Co's 1850 Directory) listed in Park Street


 

 

58 – Park Street (5)

The location of this extremely short-lived beerhouse couldn't be established because Robert Bennett wasn't living in Park Street at the time of any census.

Robert Bennett was born about 1811 in Basingstoke, Hampshire and I first found him in the 1861 census working as a footman at Beaminster House, Beaminster, Dorset. Robert moved to Yeovil and married Eliza in the spring of 1866, the same year Kelly's Directory listed him as a Park Street beer retailer. However, by the time of the 1871 census Robert and Eliza were living in Great Western Terrace with son George and daughter Louisa. Robert gave his occupation as gardener and Louisa's as laundress.

Licensees
1866 – Robert Bennett – Beer Retailer (Kelly’s 1866 Directory) listed in Park Street


 

 

59 – Park Street (6) - Golden Lion Inn

This was the Golden Lion Inn - unusual in that although it was clearly described as a beerhouse yet it is one of those rare beerhouses that had a name from the beginning. Adding to the confusion is in the 1890's the licensees were referred to as beer retailers and the 1901 census still refers to it as a beerhouse.

John Hambridge, was born about 1810 in Yeovil. In the 1841 census he was listed living in South Street with his wife, Mary, and their two children. John's occupation was listed as glover. By 1850 he was listed as a beer retailer in Belmont and by the time of the 1851 census the family now included seven children. Both John and Mary as well as four of their children (including a 9-year old) were working as glovers, but John and Mary were clearly running the Golden Lion between them. In 1861 John's family was listed in Park Street although this is most likely the same house since the distinction between Belmont and Park Street always seems to have been vague. John was listed as a grocer and beer house keeper at the Lion Beer House. John died in the autumn of 1865.

Mary / Maria was born in Yeovil around 1815. After the death of her husband Mary assumed the license of the Golden Lion Inn and was listed as the licensee in Kelly's Directory of 1866. In the 1871 census she was listed as grocer and beer house keeper. The building she occupied with her children; cabinetmaker Herbert aged 27, 21-year old Emily and 17-year old draper's assistant William, was specifically called a beer house in the census' address column, which was extremely unusual for the time. Mary died in the autumn of 1877, aged about 62.

Sarah Stockey was born about 1839 at Sparkford, eight miles northeast of Yeovil. In the 1881 census Sarah, unmarried and aged 42, was living on her own at the Golden Lion Inn and listed as its innkeeper. I could find no further mention of Sarah in the records either before or after 1881.

Licensees
1850 – John Hambridge – Beer Retailer (Hunt & Co's 1850 Directory) listed as Belmont
1861 – John Hambridge – Grocer & Beer House Keeper (1861 census) as Lion Beer House
1866 – Maria Hambridge – Beer Retailer (Kelly's 1866 Directory)
1871 – Maria Hambridge – Grocer & Beer House Keeper (1871 census) listed as Beer House
1875 – Mary Hambridge – Beer Retailer (Kelly's 1875 Directory)
1881 – Sarah Stockey – Inn Keeper (1881 census) listed as the Golden Lion Beer House


 

 

60 – Park Street (7)

From Samuel Young's position in the 1851 census, this beerhouse was down in the area of the Golden Lion where Park Street magically, and for no apparent reason, becomes Belmont.

Samuel Young was born about 1816 in East Chinnock, five miles west of Yeovil, the son of Samuel Young and his wife Grace née Trask. The 1841 census listed him living in Back Street (today's South Street) with his Yeovil-born wife, Eliza née Bragg, and their four children; Dorcas, Sarah, Samuel and Eliza. Both Samuel and Eliza were listed as glovers. In 1842 Pigot's Directory listed him as a retailer of beer in Park Street. He and Eliza were still living in Park Street, now both giving their occupations as dyers. By this time Dorcas had left home but new children included Harriet, Mary Ann, Ellen and Charles. It is most likely that Samuel continued running the beerhouse for the duration of his stay in Park Street. By 1861 the family had moved to Bond Street and by 1871 had moved again, this time to Newton Road. Samuel died in 1872 aged about 56.

Licensees
1842 – Samuel Young – Retailer of Beer (Pigot’s 1842-4 Directory)


 

 

61 – Belmont (1) - Cross Keys Inn

This beerhouse became the Cross Keys Inn in Belmont. Although the retailing of beer is only mentioned in 1842 and 1871, Joseph Ridout clearly was a spare-time beerhouse keeper and the Cross Keys was clearly in operation for a lot longer than may at first be apparent and continued for many years after he left.

Joseph Ridout, was born around 1812 in Street, Somerset. In the 1841 census Joseph's occupation was listed as a labourer and he, his wife Emma and their baby daughter, Mary Ann, were living in Belmont. It seems likely that Joseph bought a two-guinea beerhouse license because in 1842 Pigot's Directory Joseph was listed as a retailer of beer. Although there is no mention of it for two decades, Joseph clearly kept the Cross Keys beerhouse for some thirty years. By the time of the 1851 census the family was still in Belmont where Joseph, Emma and their two daughters were all listed as glovers, but there was no mention of beer. Again in 1861 there was still no mention of beer, Joseph was listed as a glover and his two daughters, Mary and Sarah, now aged 24 and 21, were both described as milliners. The family also now included Joseph and Emma's four year old son, Edwin. The 1871 census is the first time that the beerhouse is named as the Cross Keys and Joseph is listed as a beer house keeper and glover. Mary Ann was a dress maker and Sarah remained a milliner. Edwin was employed as a pupil teacher. Emma died in 1874 and by the time of the 1891 census Joseph, aged 79, was 'living on own means' in 20 Brunswick Street (same street as the earlier Belmont but closer to Hendford) with his unmarried daughter, Mary Ann, now aged 48 and listed as a milliner and mantle maker. Joseph died in 1896 aged 85.

Licensees
1841 – Joseph Ridout – Labourer (1841 census)
1842 – Joseph Ridout – Retailer of Beer (Pigot’s 1842-4 Directory) pub not named, in Belmont
1850 – Joseph Ridout – Beer Retailer (Hunt & Co's 1850 Directory) listed in Belmont
1851 – Joseph Ridout – Glover (1851 census)
1861 – Joseph Ridout – Glover Leather (1861 census)
1871 – Joseph Ridout – Beer House Keeper & Glover (1871 census) listed as Cross Keys


 

 

62 – Belmont (2) - Dolphin Inn

This beerhouse was the forerunner of the Dolphin Inn.

John Hamblin was one of many beerhouse keepers that had another trade or business, in this case it was the most common combination of grocer and beer retailer. It appears to have been common for small grocery shops to have a barrel of ale and a couple of chairs in one corner of the shop. John was born in Yeovil around 1810 and is first recorded as licensee in Robson's Somerset Directory of 1840. He appears with his wife, Hannah, in both the 1841 and 1851 censuses living in Belmont and is described in both as a grocer and beer retailer. They had no children. Hannah died in the summer of 1860 and by the time of the 1861 census John had moved to Rotten Row (today's Market Street), with a housekeeper, where his occupation was described as grocer. By 1866 John was licensee of the Nags Head Inn on Reckleford.

Licensees
1840 – John Hamblin (Robson's 1840 Somerset Directory - Beer Houses) Dolphin, Park Street
1842 – John Hamblen – Retailer of Beer (Pigot’s 1842-4 Directory)
1850 – John Hamblen – Beer Retailer (Hunt & Co's 1850 Directory) listed in Belmont
1851 – John Hamblin – Grocer & Beer Retailer (1851 census) not named


 

 

63 – Belmont (3)

John Harris was born about 1821 but not in Somerset. In the 1841 census he was listed living with his 55-year old widowed father and siblings in Belmont. His father was of independent means (and, indeed, appears in the 1846 Poll Book by virtue of owning a freehold house in Huish). John gave his occupation as Inn Keeper. Unfortunately, due to the number of men called John Harris in Yeovil at this time I was not able to trace his later life with certainty.

Licensees
1841 – John Harris – Inn Keeper (1841 census) pub not named


 

 

64 – Brunswick Street (1) - Glovers Arms 1

This was the first Glovers Arms, another short-lived beerhouse, this one run by Robert Hickman. The 1839 location noted the address as France Street, which must have been another name, perhaps colloquial, for Brunswick Street. Brunswick Street was laid out and built between 1825 and 1834 by Peter Daniell, so this beerhouse was in an almost new building on an almost new road.

Robert Hickman was born around 1800 in Axminster, Devon, and the 1841 census lists him as a beerhouse keeper with his wife, Elizabeth, and their four children; Henry, Emily, Pamela and Augustus. By 1851 Robert was living in Park Street with Augustus and 7-year old daughter and working as a glover. Elizabeth had died in 1848 and it is probable that she had run the beerhouse during the day and Robert took over in the evening. After her death, with two young children to look after, he probably wasn't able to run the beerhouse as well as work as a glover.

Licensees

1835 – Licensee not named (Robson's 1835 Directory - Beer Houses) listed as Glovers Arms,
            Brunswick Street
1839 – Robert Hickman – Beer Retailer (Robson’s 1839 Directory) listed in France Street
1840 – Robert Hickman (Somerset Gazette Directory 1840 - Beer Houses) listed as Glovers
            Arms, Brunswick Street     
1841 – Robert Heckman - Beer House Keeper (1841 census) pub not named
1842 – Robert Hickman – Retailer of Beer (Pigot’s 1842-4 Directory)


 

 

65 – Brunswick Street (2)

This is possibly a continuation of landlords of the first Glovers Arms above but is certainly not the Volunteer Inn.

Licensees
1850 – George Clapshaw – Beer Retailer (Hunt & Co's 1850 Directory) Brunswick Street
1852 – George Clapshaw – Retailer of Beer (Slater's 1852/3 Directory)


 

 

66 – 33 Brunswick Street (3)

I mentioned above it was not uncommon that, because of the potential high profits involved, the licensee was able to buy the house next door to live in and turn every room in his beerhouse into drinking rooms for customers - this is possibly an example. This was one of only three beerhouses listed in Whitby's 1882 Yeovil Almanack Advertiser.

George Rossiter was born about 1815 at West Coker, three miles southwest of Yeovil, the son of carpenter James Rossiter and his wife, Elizabeth. In the 1851 census George was living in West Coker with his parents and younger sister. He was employed as a carpenter like his father. In 1854 George married and in the 1861 census he was listed as a wheelwright and beer house keeper in Brunswick Street, where he lived with his Sherborne-born wife, Ann. They were both there ten years later when George was listed as a beerhouse keeper in the 1871 census and, indeed, ten years after that when George described his occupation as carpenter, wheelwright & beer house keeper. By this time George was aged 66 and Ann was 68. George died in 1891 at which time Ann Rossiter was listed as a widow, aged 78, living at 34 Brunswick Street.

Licensees
1861 – George Rossiter – Wheelwright & Beer House Keeper (1861 census) pub not named
1861 – George Rossiter – Beer Retailer (Kelly's 1861 Directory)
1866 – George Rossiter – Beer Retailer (Kelly's 1866 Directory)
1871 – George Rossiter – Innkeeper (1871 census) pub not named
1872 – George Rossiter – Beer Retailer (Kelly's 1872 Directory)
1875 – George Rossiter – Beer Retailer and Wheelwright (Kelly's 1875 Directory)
1881 – George Rossiter – Carpenter, Wheelwright & Beer House Keeper (1881 census) pub
            not named, called Beer House at 33 Brunswick Street.
1882 – George Rossiter – Beer Retailer (Whitby's 1882 Yeovil Almanack Advertiser)   


 

 

67 – Porter's Lane

In the early 19th century Huish Lane, more popularly called Porter's Lane, was the predecessor of modern Westminster Street but led only to fields. The sketch at left looks out from the narrow lane that was Porter's Lane towards the old Town Hall, surmounted by its clock tower, in High Street.

It was thought possible at one time that this beerhouse was the early Heart of Oak but its location in the 1841 census precludes that.

The site of the Angel Inn was on the corner of Porter's Lane, replaced by Stuckey's Bank and a small shop, at one time a branch of Linsey Denner's store - in the shadows at right in this sketch - with the printing and stationery offices of William Porter, after whom the passageway was named, on the opposite corner.

It was later run by printer Henry Custard and, later still, became a combined booksellers and reading room (a precursor of the modern library). The shop and old bank buildings were later demolished and the present bank building built over the site of the former bank building while the site of the Linsey Denner's shop was used to widen the road.

The map below is based on the 1842 Tithe Map and it will be seen that some buildings are shaded while others are simply numbered - this is to do with locating properties on the map so that the lists of owners and occupiers of the various properties could be associated with the properties on the Tithe Map.

Edmund Clarke's un-named beerhouse is shown pink on the map above. In the 1841 census his entry, the last in Porter's Lane, was immediately next to that of Henry Custard the printer in Hendford, so the sketch of Porter's Lane above would have been made while standing outside the beerhouse and looking towards High Street (although, of course, the four storey bank building seen in the sketch was not built until about 1895).

Edmund Lewis Clarke was born on 7 April 1799 at Donhead St Mary, Wiltshire, the illegitimate son of Christian Clarke and an unknown father. On 29 January 1820 he married Phoebe Dowding of Stalbridge, Dorset, in Yeovil. Robson's Directory of 1835 lists him as a beer retailer in Porter's Lane and in the 1841 census he is listed there with Phoebe and their two sons; 18-year old George, an apprentice cabinet maker and 16-year old upholsterer's apprentice, John. Edmund gave his occupation as inn keeper. Edmund was mentioned again as the beerhouse's licensee in Pigot's Directory of 1842 but by 1851 he and his family had gone and the beerhouse was no more, being replaced by cordwainer William Fooks' shoe shop. Edmund and Phoebe moved to London and in the 1861 census were listed in Chelsea, he was described as an invalid chairman and she as a laundress. Edmund died in 1862 aged about 63.

Licensees
1835 – Edmund Clarke (Robson's 1835 Somerset Directory - Beerhouses) listed in Paradise
1840 – Edmund Clarke (1840 Somerset Gazette Directory - Beerhouses)
1841 – Edmund Clarke – Inn Keeper (1841 census) pub not named, listed in Portas (sic) Lane
1842 – Edward Clarke – Beer Retailer (Pigot's 1842 Directory)


 

 

68 – Preston Road

I could find no mention of John Russell in Yeovil in the 1841 census and the only mention of him as a beer retailer is in Robson's Directory of 1839. It is possible (although impossible to prove) that John was the licensee of the fledgling Somerset Inn as it is known that the Somerset's licensee in 1841, John Ewens, had been the licensee of a beerhouse in Hendford in 1839.

Licensees
1839 – John Russell – Beer Retailer (Robson’s 1839 Directory)


 

 

69 – 1 Queen Street (1)

Both this and the following are scarce examples of 20th century beerhouses and, even more extraordinary, there are photographs of both. Queen Street ran off the northern side of Huish, just beyond the old football ground. This beerhouse was on the opposite corner of Queen Street to the Victoria Inn. It was completely destroyed during the late 1970's when it was cleared for the building of the Queensway section of the Yeovil Inner Relief Road. However, looking at the signage on the front it may be that it was a beerhouse to the end?



A 1960's photograph of Queen Street seen from Huish. At left is the Victoria Inn and at right the beerhouse at 1 Queen Street. Note that both the inn and the beerhouse have displays of bottles in their windows.




The Boys Brigade parade along Huish in the late 1970's and pass by Hoskins and Childs store which, according to the signage at first floor was still selling Courage beer, ales and stout. Although facing Huish (at this time at least, Where the parking sign is used to be Queen Street and in the space between the car park sign and the next building (the pet shop) was where, until shortly before this photo was taken, the Victoria Inn had stood. 

Licensees 
1875 – William Dade – Beer Retailer (Kelly's 1875 Directory)
1895 – Charles Dade – Shopkeeper & Beer Retailer (Kelly’s 1895 Directory) pub not named
1914 – John Harding – Beer Retailer & Shopkeeper (Kelly’s 1914 Directory) pub not named
1936 – M Symes (1936 Yeovil Directory) listed as 1 Queen Street
1938 – M Symes (1938 Yeovil Directory) listed as 1 Queen Street


 

 

70 – 67 Queen Street (2)

For details of Charles Lane see beerhouse no 28 – 64 Huish (2) above.

 

Charles Lane, photographed around 1900, at 67 Queen Street.

Licensees 
1901 – Charles Lane – Innkeeper & Tailor (1901 census) pub not named – at 67
1923 – Edward Grinter – Beer Retailer (Kelly’s 1923 Directory) pub not named but at 67
1936 – Edward B Grinter (1936 Yeovil Directory) listed as 67 Queen Street
1938 – Edward Grinter (1938 Yeovil Directory) pub not named but listed as 67 Queen Street


 

 

71 – Rotten Row / Reckleford (1) - Masons' Arms

At the time of these records Rotten Row was actually what is called Market Street today. Rotten Row, so called from horses being paraded there, especially at times of the fairs, was named after the broad track in Hyde Park, London, still reserved for the exercise of horses.

Samuel Trask was the only licensee. He was a roper by trade and was born in Somerset around 1791. On 25 December 1920 he married Mary Sweet at Merriott, but Mary died in September 1838. Samuel married his second wife, Ann, in January 1841 in Yeovil. Although the Mason's Arms was listed in Robson's 1835 Somerset Directory, Trask was not named, although he was listed as its licensee in the 1839 Directory. In the 1841 census he was listed with his second wife, Ann, and his two sons and a daughter from his first marriage. He was listed again in Pigot's Directory in 1842 but then I lost him in the records until his death in Yeovil in December 1865 aged about 74.

Licensees
1835 – Licensee not named (Robson’s 1835 Somerset Directory; Beer Houses) Masons' Arms
1839 – Samuel Trask – Beer Retailer (Robson’s 1839 Directory)
1840 – Samuel Trash (sic) (Somerset Gazette 1840 Directory; Beer Houses) as Masons' Arms
1841 – Samuel Trask – Roper (1861 census) pub not named but listed in Rotten Row
1842 – Samuel Trask – Retailer of Beer (Pigot’s 1842-4 Directory) listed in Reckleford


 

 

72 – Rotten Row / Reckleford (2)

This beerhouse was also in Rotten Row, today's Market Street.

James Samuel Jeans, was born around 1791 in Somerset and was listed in the 1841 census with his wife, Jemima, and five of their children. James was listed as a glover and the family were living in Rotten Row. James was listed as the licensee of the Glovers Arms in Pigot's Directory of 1842 but he died in September 1843.

Licensees
1842 – James Jeans - Retailer of Beer (Pigot’s 1842 Directory - Beer Houses)


 

 

73 – 6 Rustywell, Hendford Hill - Rustywell Inn

There is a typical Victorian domestic terrace of five small cottages, of the 'two up, two down' type, in Rustywell, just beyond the modern caravan park, These are shown on the 1886 Ordnance Survey map and No 6 was the beerhouse in question. This was probably the longest-running beerhouse in Yeovil, a minimum of 67 years - longer than many 'proper' pubs.

George Lilley was born about 1834 at Lydlinch, Dorset, fifteen miles east of Yeovil. I could only find two records relating to George; the first was the 1871 census in which, listed as a beer house keeper, he was living in Rustywell with his wife, Susan, born at Trent just east of Yeovil. The couple reappeared in the 1881 census in which George gave his occupation as inn keeper. I was unable to trace them any further.

I could find no record concerning John Dibben.

Albert Edward Axe was born in 1870 in Yeovil, the son of groom and coachman Mark Axe and his wife, Mary née Purchase. In 1871 Albert was living with his parents at Houndstone, Yeovil. By 1881 the family were living in West Coker and Albert had two younger brothers, Frank and Archibald. The 1891 census found Albert, now aged 21, living in Bishopsgate Police Station, London, as a constable of the City of London Police. On 31 December 1895 Albert married Agnes Heley of Ivinghoe, Buckinghamshire, in London. In 1897 Albert and Agnes had a son, Albert, who was born in the City of London and was followed by two brothers, Percival and Stanley, both born in Bethnal Green. In the winter of 1890-91 the family moved back to Yeovil and in the 1901 census Albert was listed as a beer house keeper at Rustywell. By 1903 Albert was running the Volunteer Inn in Hendford but he died in the spring of 1904 aged just 34.

William John Hewlett was born at Alvington, Yeovil in 1877 the son of railway labourer Samuel Hewlett and his wife, Dorcas. In 1899 William married Agnes May Caines and in the 1901 census William and Agnes were living at Camp, on the western edge of Yeovil, where William was working as a general labourer. By 1911 Whitby's Yeovil Almanack Advertiser was listing William as the licensee of the Rustywell Inn and in the census of the same year William was living there with Agnes and their three children; Harold, Gladys and Sylvia. William gave his occupation as general labourer although various trade directories listed him as the licensee of the Rustywell Inn until 1938. William died on 13 February 1940 and his will was proved on 10 June 1940 at Bristol to Agnes May Hewlett of 6 Rustywell, Yeovil, total effects of £1,579 5s 6d (worth about £75,000 at 2017's value)

Licensees
1871 – George Lilley – Beer House Keeper (1871 census) George was living in Rustywell
1881 – George Lilly – Inn Keeper (1881 census) listed at Rustywell
1895 – John Dibben – Beer Retailer (Kelly’s 1895 Directory) pub not named
1901 – Albert Axe – Beer House Keeper (1901 census) pub not named
1911 – William John Hewlett (Whitby's 1911 Yeovil Almanack Advertiser) listed as Rustywell Inn
1914 – William Hewlett – Beer Retailer (Kelly’s 1914 Directory) pub not named
1916 – William John Hewlett (Whitby's 1916 Yeovil Almanack Advertiser) listed as Rustywell Inn
1923 – William Hewlett – Beer Retailer (Kelly’s 1923 Directory) pub not named
1936 – William J Hewlett (1936 Yeovil Directory) listed as Rustywell
1938 – William Hewlett (1938 Yeovil Directory) pub not named but listed at Rustywell


 

 

A Note on the Pubs of South Street / Back Street

 

In the early part of the nineteenth century there were a surprising number of beerhouses at the western end of Back Street (today's South Street) as seen from the map below. What is possibly more surprising is that while the beerhouses were on the north side of the street, the houses on the south side opposite were distinctly upper class. On the map below the Three Choughs Hotel (marked 'A') was technically in Hendford and the Bell Inn 2 (marked 'G') was in High Street.

 


 

 

74 – South Street (1) - King's Arms 2

Marked 'B' on the map above, this was a short-lived beerhouse in South Street not to be confused with the earlier King's Arms in Back Kingston which ceased trading in the 1840's, thus releasing the King's Arms name, or the later King's Arms in Silver Street which is recorded as trading under the King's Arms name from the 1860's.

Richard Bennetts was born in Mayler, Cornwall around 1789 and his wife, Mary, was born in St Mary's, Cornwall in 1801. They had at least two children in Cornwall, twins William and Henry, born around 1826 but they moved to Yeovil shortly thereafter because their next son, Roderick, was born about 1828 in Somerset. In 1841 Richard Bennetts, described as a painter, and his family (now enlarged with two daughters, Belinda and Harriott, and another son, Frederick) were living in South Street. Interestingly, they were living next door to Humphrey Jeans' beerhouse called the Market House Inn. In 1851 Richard and his family were still living in South Street and this is where Richard set up his beerhouse which he called the King's Arms. The location of this was next to the Market House Inn and today the site is occupied by the Post Office car park at the southeast corner of South Street and King George Street. By this time the only children living at home were Harriett, Fred and new addition, Charles. In 1852 Richard was listed as the licensee of the King's Arms in Slater's Directory. By the time of the 1861 census Richard was dead and Mary, with her young son Charles, was living with her son Frederick and his family in Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire.

The building was finally destroyed by fire on 23 February 1906 as seen in the photograph below.

Licensees
1851 – Richard Bennetts – Painter and Inn Keeper (1851 census) pub not named
1852 – Richard Bennetts – Inn Keeper (Slater’s 1852 Directory) as the Kings Arms, South Street

 

The postcard here is dated 23 February 1906 - the date the building that had housed the King's Arms 2 was completely destroyed by fire although it hadn't of course, been a beerhouse for several decades. The firemen in the first floor window and the crowd at ground level are facing the photographer who was standing in South Street. The man with the bowler hat is standing at the entrance to the house next to the Cheese Market

 


 

 

75 – South Street (2)

Marked 'C' on the map above. The Cheese Market included that part marked as such on the map as well as the areas indicated in yellow as the beerhouse sites. 

From their positions in the 1841 census William Rowsell's and Thomas Brett's beerhouses (South Street 2 and 3) were in buildings on the western corner of George Court. These buildings were, I believe, demolished around 1848 at the same time that the Town Commissioners demolished the old Market House (where indoor markets were held) and the Shambles (where butchers had their shops or stalls) in the Borough. In 1849 the Town Commissioners built a new Town Hall with the Cheese Market behind it, built over the site of these two beerhouses.

William Rowsell was born about 1791 in Somerset and was first found in the 1834 Poll Book in which he was listed by virtue of owning a freehold property in Vicarage Street, although he actually lived in Hendford. In the 1841 census, where he described his occupation as grocer, he was living in South Street as located on the map above with his wife, Mary, and children Albert, Edwin, James, Sarah and Benjamin. Mary died in the winter of 1847 and, as mentioned above, I believe this property was demolished around 1848. Consequently William relocated his family to London and in the 1851 census he was listed as a 60-year old widower, working as a glover in Aldersgate, London, with all his children.

See also the beerhouse at Vicarage Street which may be a second beerhouse run in 1842 by William and Mary.

Licensees
1841 – William Rowsell – Grocer (1841 census)
1842 – William Rowsell – Retailer of Beer (Pigot’s 1842-4 Directory)


 

 

76 – South Street (3)

Marked 'D' on the map above. The Cheese Market included that part marked as such on the map as well as the areas indicated in yellow as the beerhouse sites.  

Thomas William Brett was born about 1820 in Yeovil, the son of John Brett and his wife Elizabeth, née Ridout. In the 1841 census Thomas was listed as a beer seller in a beerhouse in South Street and was living with his older brother John, a tailor, and his family. It is clear from the records below that both brothers ran the beerhouse. From the position of Thomas' entry in the census the site of this beerhouse is marked 'D' on the map above and, similarly, I believe this property was demolished around 1848.

In the 1851 census Thomas was listed as a tailor living in Middle Street with his mother and sister, Catherine. Hayward noted that T Brett was licensee of the Grape Inn 2 in Wine Street in 1856. Thomas married in the spring of 1857 and in the 1861 census he and his wife, Hannah, were living in Duke of York Court with their four children. Thomas described his occupation as butcher and tailor. By 1871 Thomas, still a tailor, had moved his family to Belmont Street although Hannah wasn't listed in this census or the next in which Thomas and his son John, both working as tailors, were boarding in Victoria Buildings. By 1891 Thomas and John were living with Thomas' daughter Bridget and her husband, Samuel Hamblin, in Newton Road. Thomas, now aged 73 was still listed as married (although there had been no sign of Harriett since 1861) and still gave his occupation as tailor. In the 1901 census Thomas had finally retired and, at the age of 83, was living in the Woborn Almshouse.

In the meantime John Brett, Thomas' older brother, had moved to Middle Street by 1851 with his wife, Jane, and their seven children. John worked as a tailor. John died in 1847.

Licensees
1841 – Thomas Brett - Beer Seller (1841 census)
1842 – John Brett - Retailer of Beer (Pigot’s 1842 Directory - Beer Houses)


 

 

77 – South Street (4) - Market House Inn

The Market House Inn was on the corner of George Court and is marked 'E' on the map above.

Humphrey Jeans was born in Yeovil about 1797. He is recorded as a beer seller in Robson's Directory of 1839. The 1841 census shows Humphrey with his wife, Mary, and daughter, Elizabeth. Next door was Richard Bennetts, a painter, and his family; Richard was to set up the Kings Arms (2) within the following ten years. In the 1851 census Humphrey described his occupation as 'Collector of Market Tolls' which he was to repeat ten years later - it seems that Humphrey was quite happy to advertise the Market Street Inn in various trade directories, but when it came to the official census his official title was given. Humphrey died in 1865 and Mary died in 1869.

Licensees
1839 – Humphrey Jeans – Beer Retailer (Robson’s 1839 Directory)
1841 – Humphrey Jeans – Beer Seller (1841 census) listed as in George Court, South Street
1842 – Humphrey Jeans – Retailer of Beer (Pigot's 1842 Directory) listed as in George Court
1850 – Humphrey Jeans – Retailer of Beer (Pigot's 1850 Directory) listed as Market House Inn
1850 – Humphrey Jeans – Beer Retailer (Hunt & Co's 1850 Directory) listed in South Street 
1851 – Humphrey Jeans – Collector of Market Tolls (1851 census)
1852 – Humphrey Jeans – Retailer of Beer (Slater's 1852/3 Directory)
1853 – Humphrey Jeans (Slater's 1853 Directory) listed as Market House Inn, South Street 
1861 – Humphrey Jeans – Retailer of Beer (Pigot's 1861 Directory) listed as Market House Inn


 

 

78 – South Street (5)

This un-named beerhouse is marked 'F' on the map above. George's record in the 1851 census listed his beerhouse between Humphrey Jeans at the Market House Inn and Job Osment at  the Cow Inn.

George Harris was born about 1817 in Winsham, some 16 miles west of Yeovil. He may have been the George Harris running the Pall Tavern in 1839 and 1840, but it isn't likely. In the 1851 census George was listed as an innkeeper in South Street with his wife Jane, née Saint, their four children, two step-children and his father-in-law, retired baker William Saint.

 

This photograph of about 1910 shows the two-storey building at centre with a bracket for a hanging sign in which George Harris ran his beerhouse. The Market House Inn is the three-storied building to left of centre. The two-storied building to its left is the Cheese Market building with the first of its three arches at ground floor level just visible. Between the two buildings is the entrance to George Court.

Licensees
1851 – George Harris – Inn Keeper (1851 census)
1861 – George Harris – Shop Keeper & Beer Retailer (1861 census)


 

 

79 – South Street (6) - Cow Inn

This was the beerhouse, known from its inception, as the Cow Inn in South Street, marked 'H' on the map above.

The first licensee, William Jeans, is listed in the Beer Houses section of the Somerset Gazette Directory of 1840 although he doesn't appear to be listed in the 1841 census and neither does the Cow Inn. A 65-year old rope manufacturer called William Jeanes was living in Middle Street according to the 1851 census but whether it is the same William is not clear.
 
There's a little more information on the next licensee, George Brown, who was born in Yeovil about 1823. In the 1851 census his occupation is given as a mason and he was living in Bond Street with his glove sewer wife, Louisa, and two young sons, William aged 3 and George aged 1. By 1859 he is listed in Hunt's Directory as the licensee of the Cow Inn. By 1861 three daughters had been added to their family, Mary, Alma and Louisa and George gave his occupation in the census as beer retailer and mason. George died in the winter of 1870 and in the 1871 census Louisa is listed as the innkeeper and living in the Cow Inn with two of her daughters, Mary and Louisa. In 1875 the Post Office Directory listed a Mrs Elizabeth Brown as a beer retailer, but this is assumed to be a mistake with the forename. By 1881 the two Louisa's were living at 6 South Western Terrace, the mother described as an annuitant (a person who receives income from an insurance annuity) and the daughter, a milliner. 

Licensees
1835 – Licensee not named (Robson's 1835 Somerset Directory - Beer Houses) listed as Cow
1840 – William Jeans (Somerset Gazette 1840 Directory - Beer Houses) listed as Cow
1859 – George Brown (Hunt & Co 1859 Directory - Beer Retailers) listed as Cow, South Street
1861 – George Brown – Beer Retailer & Mason (1861 census) pub not named
1861 – George Brown – Beer Retailer and Shopkeeper (Kelly's 1861 Directory)
1866 – George Brown – Beer Retailer and Shopkeeper (1866 Post Office Directory)


 

 

80 – South Street (7) - Greyhound Inn 2

The Greyhound Inn is marked 'I' on the map above.

Job Osment was born on 26 August 1821 at Nether Cerne, Dorset. In the 1841 census while living in Dorchester, Dorset, he was listed as a male servant and it was in Dorchester that he met Sophia Stoodley and they married in Poole, Dorset, on 20 December 1845. By the time of the 1851 census Job and Sophia had moved to Yeovil and Job was listed as a licensed victualler running the Greyhound in South Street and he was also listed here in Slater's Directory of 1852. When the Elephant and Castle opened in 1860, Job was its first licensee and he is listed as such in the 1861 census with Sophia. Sadly, on 2 April 1862, at the age of 40, Job committed suicide by leaping from a window of the Elephant and Castle - for the full story of Job's demise see the Elephant and Castle's page

Licensees
1850 – Job Osment – Beer Retailer (Hunt & Co's 1850 Directory)
1851 – Job Osmond - Licensed Victualler (1851 census)
1852 – Job Osment – Inn Keeper (Slater’s 1852 Directory)


 

 

81 – South Street (8) - Globe and Crown

This was the forerunner of the Globe and Crown in South Street, probably in an earlier building than the present one which was most likely built during the 1870's. It is marked 'J' on the map above.

Licensees
1839 – George Wines – Beer Retailer (Robson’s 1839 Directory)
1841 – George Wines – Beer Seller (1841 census) pub not named
1842 – George Wines – Retailer of Beer (Pigot’s 1842-4 Directory)
1851 – George Wines – Publican (1851 census) by 1871 George was age 71, retired and
            living in Park Street


 

 

82 – South Street (9)

It is not possible to pinpoint exactly where this beerhouse was situated but the best guess, based on locations within various census records, is on the southern side of South Street between Union Street and Bond Street, towards the Park Street end of this section.

Thomas Hodges was born in Mudford, just northeast of Yeovil, about 1807, the son of Jonathan Hodges and Eleanor née Wilton. In the 1841 census he was living in South Street with his wife, Ann, and their son, four-year old Herbert. Thomas gave his occupation as wheeler. Hunt & Co's Directory of 1850 first lists Thomas as a beer retailer and in 1851 the family were still living in the house in South Street but Thomas now gave his occupation as beer retailer and carpenter master employing three men. Slater's Directory of 1852 again lists Thomas as a retailer of beer. By 1861 Thomas and Ann, with their 4-year old grandson Henry, were living in Little Lane (now called Tabernacle Lane) just around the corner from the Greyhound Inn 2. Thomas listed his occupation as carpenter employing two men and one boy. By 1871 Thomas, Ann and grandson Henry were living in South Street on the junction with Pen Hill. This time Thomas listed his occupation as carpenter employing one man and a boy. Thomas died in 1872.

Licensees
1850 – Thomas Hodges – Beer Retailer (Hunt & Co's 1850 Directory)
1851 – Thomas Hodges – Beer Retailer & Carpenter Master employing 3 men
1852 – Thomas Hodges – Retailer of Beer (Slater's 1852/3 Directory)


 

 

83 – South Street (10)

From its location in the 1861 census, this un-named beerhouse was located in Woborn Terrace - a row of houses facing South Street and next to the Woborn Almshouse on the corner of South Street and Bond Street and with Holy Trinity church behind the terrace. In fact the Woborn Almshouse was only built on this site in 1860, being relocated from its dilapidated Medieval building behind the Pall Inn, so it is likely Woborn Terrace was built around the same time. It may, of course, be that this beerhouse was the same as the previous beerhouse although this is impossible to prove.

Robert Mullins was born in East Coker, a couple of miles west of Yeovil, about 1823, the son of William Mullins and his wife, Mary. In the 1841 census Robert was living away from home in East Coker and working as an agricultural labourer. By the time of the 1851 census Robert was working as a baker journeyman and living in Bond Street with the family of master baker Reuben Pedwell. Robert and Reuben's daughter Leah were married and by 1861 they were living in South Street where Robert described his occupation in the census as baker but Kelly's Directory of the same year described him as a beer retailer and baker. By this time Robert and Leah had three children aged under five; Mary, William and Harriott. Robert died on 8 March 1866 at the age of 42 and, sadly, Leah died the same year aged just 37.

Licensees
1861 – Robert Mullins – Beer Retailer and Baker (Kelly's 1861 Directory)
1861 – Robert Mullins – Baker (1861 census)


 

 

84 – South Street (11) - Royal Oak 1

This beerhouse was the Royal Oak 1, not to be confused with the later Royal Oak 2 public house in Wine Street which, at this time, was called the Queen's Arms. The most likely location of this beerhouse was on the south side of South Street between Bond Street and Stars Lane.

The only known licensee was Isaac Taylor, born in Yeovil around 1786. He is listed as licensee in the Beer Houses section of the 1840 Somerset Gazette Directory and is listed in the 1841 census as an innkeeper with his wife, Elizabeth. He is listed again in Pigot's Directory of 1842 but by the time of the 1851 census, Isaac and Elizabeth had moved just around the corner into Bond Street, where Isaac was listed as a shop keeper. By 1861 Isaac and Elizabeth had moved to London and the census lists them as living in Aldersgate with Isaac a 76-year old labourer and Elizabeth a 71-year old dress maker.

Licensees
1835 – Licensee not named (Robson's Somerset Directory) listed as Royal Oak, Back Street
1840 – Isaac Taylor (1840 Somerset Gazette Directory - Beer Houses) listed as Royal Oak
1841 – Isaac Taylor – Inn Keeper (1841 census) pub not named
1842 – Isaac Taylor – Retailer of Beer (Pigot’s 1842-4 Directory) listed as Back Street


 

 

85 – 16 South Street (12)

From its relative location in the 1851 census this beerhouse was most likely situated on the northern side of South Street between the Triangle and Bond Street, but closer to Bond Street - approximately at the western end of the car park on the north side of South Street.

George Hann was born about 1798 at Leigh, Somerset (not sure which Leigh), the son of George Hann. He was married to Sarah and in the 1841 census they were listed as living at Odcombe, four miles west of Yeovil. George gave his occupation as farmer and was living with Coker-born Sarah and their 20-year old son, Hugh, and George's 75-year old father, also George, who was listed as independent. By 1850 George was listed as this beerhouse's licensee in Hunt & Co's Directory. In the 1851 census George, Sarah and Hugh were listed in South Street with George's occupation listed as horse dealer. Interestingly in the same house was living 26-year old Mary Fudge and 19-year old Melina Hambridge - both listed as 'inmates'. Hmmm... might George have been trading in a bit more than horse flesh? George died in the spring of 1852 aged about 54 and this beerhouse likely closed at his demise. Sarah died in 1858.

Licensees
1850 – George Hann – Beer Retailer (Hunt & Co's 1850 Directory)
1851 – George Hanne -– Horse Dealer (1851 census)
1852 – George Hann – Retailer of Beer (Slater's 1852/3 Directory)


 

 

86 – 9 South Street (13)

From its relative location in the 1851 census this beerhouse was most likely situated on the northern side of South Street between the Triangle and Bond Street, but closer to the Triangle - approximately where the entrance is to the car park on the north side of South Street.

Richard Dodge was born at Closworth, just a few miles south of Yeovil, around 1801. In the 1841 census he was living in Back Street (today's South Street) with his wife Ann and gave his occupation as agricultural labourer. He was listed in the 1851 census at 9 South Street with Ann and two grandsons, but on this occasion Richard gave his occupation as publican. By the time of the 1861 census Richard, by now aged 60, was still living with 68-year old Ann but was again listing his occupation as agricultural labourer even though Kelly's Directory of 1866 listed him as a beer retailer although Richard died in the summer of this year.

Licensees
1851 – Richard Dadge – Publican (1851 census) pub not named but listed at 9 South Street
1852 – Richard Dodge – Retailer of Beer (Slater's 1852/3 Directory)
1861 – Richard Dodge – Beer Retailer (Kelly's 1861 Directory)
1866 – Richard Dodge – Beer Retailer (Kelly's 1866 Directory)


 

 

87 – 39 South Street (14)

From its location in the 1871 this beerhouse would appear to be in an almost identical position to the previous - situated on the northern side of South Street between the Triangle and Bond Street, but closer to the Triangle - approximately where the entrance is to the car park on the north side of South Street. As such it is quite likely, albeit not provable, that Isaac Geard took over the beerhouse license of Richard Dodge above. This was one of only three beerhouses listed in Whitby's 1882 Yeovil Almanack Advertiser.

This Isaac Geard (there were, unbelievably, two men called Isaac Geard in Yeovil at the time) was born in Yeovil about 1830 and was married to Montacute-born Elizabeth, some ten years his senior. In the 1851 census Isaac and Elizabeth were living at Towns End at its junction, if indeed you could call it that, with London Road. They both gave their occupations as glover. By 1861 they had moved to Park Street, he worked as a glover leather parer and Elizabeth as glove sewer. In the 1871 census the couple were listed as living in South Street and it is at this time that Isaac was first listed as glover and innkeeper. He was twice listed as a beer retailer in Kelly's Directory, in 1872 and 1875. In the 1881 census Isaac and Elizabeth were listed in North Cadbury, presumably on a visit to his brother-in-law who farmed there. Isaac gave his occupation as glover and inn keeper and Elizabeth gave hers as inn keeper's wife. Isaac died in the summer of 1888, aged about 58.

Licensees
1871 – Isaac Geard – Glover & Innkeeper (1871 census) pub not named
1872 – Isaac Geard – Beer Retailer (Kelly's 1872 Directory)
1872 – Isaac Geard – License renewed (Borough Petty Sessions)
1875 – Isaac Geard – Beer Retailer (Kelly's 1875 Directory)
1881 – Isaac Geard – Glover & Inn Keeper (1881 census) listed in North Cadbury, presumably
            visiting
1882 – Isaac Geard – Beer Retailer (Whitby's 1882 Yeovil Almanack Advertiser) listed at
            39 South Street


 

 

88 – South Street (15)

I could find no entry in either the 1841 or 1851 census for Henry or Jane Tiptree, even looking at every individual living in South Street in the 1851 census which, you'd have thought, would at least found Jane. I did, however, find her in the 1861 census still in Back Street (South Street), aged 66 and working as a housekeeper. She was living with her leather glover son, Walter, and two boarders but there was no indication of whether the beerhouse was still in operation. Her location in the census however places her beerhouse (assuming she hadn't moved house) on the north side of South Street between Turnstile Lane (near the Triangle) but much closer to the Triangle than Bond Street - about where the advertising hoarding is in the waste ground next to the chip shop.

Licensees
1842 – Henry Tiptree – Retailer of Beer (Pigot’s 1842-4 Directory)
1850 – Jane Tiptree – Beer Retailer (Hunt & Co's 1850 Directory) listed in South Street
1852 – Jane Tiptree – Retailer of Beer (Slater's 1852/3 Directory)


 

 

89 – South Street (16) - Golden Compass

This was an early, albeit short-lived, beerhouse in South Street known as the Golden Compass.

Edward Coleman was born in Milborne Port, Somerset around 1786 and was the only listed licensee of the Golden Compass. He may have set up the establishment in the mid-1830's but is only named in 1840. However he appears to have always lived in Bond Street - he was listed in the 1832 Poll Book by virtue of owning his freehold house in Bond Street and in the 1841 census he was listed as a tailor living in Bond Street with his Yeovil-born wife, Ann, and daughters Adelaide and Sarah. His trade was again given as tailor in the 1851 census and Edward and Ann were still living in Bond Street in 1851 with their granddaughter, Louisa. Edward died in Yeovil in 1854.

Licensees
1835 – Licensee not named (Robson’s 1835 Somerset Directory - Beer Houses) listed as
            Golden Compass, South Street
1840 – Edward Coleman (Somerset Gazette 1840 Directory - Beer Houses) listed as
            Golden Compass, South Street.


 

 

90 – South Street (17)

There were three men named John Hammond in Yeovil in the 1841 census, none of whom lived in South Street, and it is not possible to identify with certainty any other records of this beerhouse keeper.

Licensees
1842 – John Hammond - Retailer of Beer (Pigot’s 1842 Directory - Beer Houses)


 

 

91 – South Street (18)

It is not possible to determine the exact location of this beerhouse since Henry didn't live in South Street at the time of a census.

Henry Cridland was born about 1834 at Bradford Abbas, Dorset, just south of Yeovil, the son of mason William Cridland and Mary née Hobby. In both the 1841 and 1851 census returns Henry was living at home with his parents and three younger siblings. In 1861 Henry married Dorcas Bargery in Yeovil and in the 1861 census Henry and Dorcas were living in Vicarage Street where Henry described his occupation as plasterer. In 1866 Kelly's Directory listed Henry as a beer retailer in South Street but by the time of the 1871 census Henry and Dorcas had moved to Battersea, London. They spent the rest of their lives in London and Henry died in Wandsworth in 1894 aged 60.

Licensees
1866 – Henry Cridland – Beer Retailer (Kelly's 1866 Directory)


 

 

92 – South Street (19)

The reference below for David Langford in Kelly's Directory was actually a misprint for David Langdon.

David Langdon was born on 7 December 1835 at Barwick & Stoford, just a mile or two south of Yeovil. He was the son of stone mason David Langdon and his wife Elizabeth née Hayward. In the 1841 census David was living with his parents and older sisters, Emily and Hester, at Barwick. In 1851 the family were living in Stoford, Hester had left home and a new daughter, Elizabeth, was living with them. On 11 August 1858 David married Jane Hellier of Stoke sub Hamdon, some 11 years his senior, at nearby Bradford Abbas. In the 1861 census David and Jane, with baby son George and a 12-year old servant, were living in Wellington Street. David described his occupation as bread baker. However he was also running a beerhouse as in Kelly's Directory of 1866 he was listed as a beer retailer - see beerhouse102 - Wellington Street. By 1871 David, Jane and George had moved to South Street where David gave his occupation as baker and grocer. Also living with them were their three servants. In fact he was also a beer retailer because in Kelly's Directory of 1872 he was listed (albeit as David Langford) as running this beerhouse in South Street. David Langdon died on 01 December 1873 aged 37.

Licensees
1872 – David Langford – Beer Retailer (Kelly's 1872 Directory)


 

 

93 – Towns End (1)

 A beerhouse in Town's End run for a couple of years by Thomas Walter.

Thomas Walter was born about 1811 in Somerset and by the time of the 1841 census was the licensee of this short-lived beerhouse at Townsend (in this context Lower Middle Street), where he lived with his Ilchester-born wife, Jane, and six children. From its relative position within the 1841 census this beerhouse was most likely immediately next to Ebenezer Row (today this would probably be around the entrance to Poundland). His occupation was given as a smith. Thomas died in March 1851 aged about 40 and his wife, Jane, took on the license of the John Bull. She was listed as the innkeeper of the John Bull Inn in the 1851 census that was taken on the last night of March. Living with her were her eight children aged under 16 and a house servant. Jane was listed in trade directories until Slater's Directory of 1852/3. Certainly by 1859 Jane had moved on but I found no further record of her.

Licensees
1841 – Thomas Walter – Smith (1841 census) pub not named
1842 – Thomas Walter – Retailer of Beer (Pigot’s 1842-4 Directory)  


 

 

94 – Towns End (2)

There were two men called George Wills in the 1861 census, an agricultural labourer living near the Red House Inn and a glove manufacturer living in Middle Street and employing four hands - this beerhouse owner could be either of them but in any case neither of them were present in the 1871 census.

Licensees
1866 – George Wills – Beer Retailer (Kelly's 1866 Directory)


 

 

95 – Vicarage Street (1)

Strange one, this. The only Mary Rowsell in Yeovil in the 1841 census was the wife of William Rowsell, grocer and beerhouse keeper of a beerhouse in South Street - see beerhouse 75 – South Street (2), above. They are both listed in the 1841 census as living in South Street but Pigot's 1842-4 Directory lists William as a retailer of beer in South Street and Mary as a retailer of beer in Vicarage Street.

Like I said, strange, and I have no explanation other than the couple were running two beerhouses at the same time.

Licensees
1842 – Mary Rowsell – Retailer of Beer (Pigot’s 1842-4 Directory)


 

 

96 – Vicarage Street (2) - Anchor Inn

This is most likely the forerunner of the Anchor Inn in Vicarage Street.

William Foot was born around 1809 at Sydling St Nicholas, Dorset, some dozen miles south of Yeovil. In 1850 he was listed as a Vicarage Street beer retailer in Hunt & Co's Directory and in the 1851 census he was listed as an innkeeper living with his wife, Anna, and sons William and James in Vicarage Street. William Foot died in the spring of 1858.

Elizabeth Whilly was born at Pendomer, some five miles southwest of Yeovil, around 1803. The only reference I could find for her was the 1861 census in which she appears as a 58-year old spinster who gave her occupation as beer house keeper.

Licensees
1850 – William Foot – Beer Retailer (Hunt & Co's 1850 Directory) not named, in Vicarage Street
1851 – William Foot – Inn Keeper (1851 census)
1861 – Elizabeth Whilly – Beer House Keeper (1861 census) pub not named


 

 

97 – Vicarage Street (3) - Six Bells 2

This was the Six Bells beerhouse in Vicarage Street, not the Six Bells alehouse.

Sarah Sprake was born about 1785 in Yeovil and is first mentioned as licensee of the Six Bells in the beerhouses section of the 1840 Somerset Gazette directory. She was listed in the 1841 census but, not unusual for women at this time, her occupation was not listed. Living with her was her seven-year old son, Robert. Sarah was probably the widow of Robert Sprake who died in Yeovil in 1839. Pigot's Directory of 1842 listed her as a retailer of beer but by the time of the 1851 census she was living in Kiddles Lane (today's Eastland Road) off Reckleford with her son Frederick and his family. Sarah died in the spring of 1854.


Licensees
1835 – Licensee not listed (Robson's 1835 Somerset Directory - Beer Houses) listed as
            Six Bells, Vicarage Street
1840 – Sarah Sprake (1840 Somerset Gazette Directory - Beer Houses) listed as
            Six Bells, Vicarage Street
1841 – Sarah Sprake (1841 census) listed as Vicarage Street
1842 – Sarah Sprake – Retailer of Beer (Pigot's 1842 Directory) listed as Vicarage Street


 

 

98 –  Vicarage Street (4)

John Vickery initially ran this beerhouse in Vicarage Street in the 1840's with his wife, Hannah, but had moved to Belmont and opened Yeovil's first Britannia Inn by 1850 - see which for more information on John.

Licensees
1839 – John Vickery – Beer Retailer (Robson’s 1839 Directory) John was a Grocer of
            Vicarage Street in 1841.
1842 – John Vickery – Retailer of Beer (Pigot’s 1842-4 Directory)


 

 

99 – Vicarage Street (6)

This beerhouse was roughly central in Vicarage Street but impossible to say which side of the street.

John Howe was born in Yeovil around 1816 and appears in the 1841 census living in Vicarage Street with his wife Elizabeth, one-year old son John and baby daughter Sarah. John gave his occupation as glover and Elizabeth gave hers as glove sewer. John was listed in the 1846 Poll Book by virtue of owning a freehold house and garden in South Street occupied by Elias Hamlin. In 1850 John was listed as a beer retailer in Hunt & Co's Directory and in the 1851 census the couple were still living in Vicarage street with a new baby, William. John was working as a glove cutter and Elizabeth as a glove sewer. It seems clear that Elizabeth was working from home and running the beerhouse during the day and that John took over in the evening. The situation was little different in 1861 so that it may be that the beerhouse was still being run - there's simply no way of telling although certainly John wasn't listed in any further trade directories after the 1850 listing. John died in the autumn of 1868 aged about 52.

Licensees
1850 – John Howe – Beer Retailer (Hunt & Co's 1850 Directory) listed in Vicarage Street


 

 

100 – Vicarage Street (7)

Another strange one - the only William Baulch in the area around 1870 was a glover and leather dresser born in Stoke sub Hamdon about 1831, Walter was his son and born about 1857 making him about 9 at the time of the listing in Kelly's Directory of 1866. Even assuming that Walter should be William in this listing, the only official record in which I could find them was the 1871 census when they were both living in Park Street - perhaps running a beerhouse in Vicarage Street but not living there?

Licensees
1866 – Walter Baulch – Beer Retailer (Kelly's 1866 Directory)
1872 – William Baulch – Beer Retailer (Kelly's 1872 Directory)


 

 

101 – 24 Vincent Street

Caroline Milligan was born Caroline Moore about 1834 at Stalbridge, Dorset, the daughter of farmer of 20 acres William Moore and his wife, Elizabeth. known as Betsy. In the 1851 census she was living at Stalbridge with her parents and four older siblings. In the 1861 census she was still living at home with her parents, now retired, and older siblings Robert and Eliza. Robert was a labourer and Caroline and Eliza were both glovers. By 1871 both her parents had died and Robert was now the head of the household. Robert, Eliza and Caroline were all unmarried and yet Robert's two sons lived with them as well. In the winter of 1886 Caroline, at the age of 52, married James Roxborough Milligan a draper living at 15 Hendford who hailed from Kirkcudbrightshire, Scotland. James had lost his wife, Sarah, the previous winter and had a young son and daughter, Sidney and Maggie, to bring up. In the 1891 census Caroline replaced Sarah at 15 Hendford but James died in the summer of 1895. By the time of the 1901 census Caroline was living at 24 Vincent Street and listed as a 63-year old widow giving her occupation as inn keeper. Living with her was her older sister, un-named in the 1901 census but revealed as Eliza in the 1911 census. Both now in their 70's, Caroline gave her occupation as boarding house keeper, still at 24 Vincent Street. Whether or not the boarding house was also a beerhouse at this time is not known. Caroline died in the first quarter of 1913.

Licensees
1901 – Caroline Milligan – Inn Keeper (1901 census) pub not named


 

 

102 – Wellington Street

This beerhouse was neither the Wellington Inn nor the Rose Inn as both had licensees at the time.

David Langdon was born on 7 December 1835 at Barwick & Stoford, just a mile or two south of Yeovil. He was the son of stone mason David Langdon and his wife Elizabeth née Hayward. In the 1841 census David was living with his parents and older sisters, Emily and Hester, at Barwick. In 1851 the family were living in Stoford, Hester had left home and a new daughter, Elizabeth, was living with them. On 11 August 1858 David married Jane Hellier of Stoke sub Hamdon, some 11 years his senior, at nearby Bradford Abbas. In the 1861 census David and Jane, with baby son George and a 12-year old servant, were living in Wellington Street. David described his occupation as bread baker. In Kelly's Directory of 1866 he was also listed as a beer retailer. By 1871 David, Jane and George had moved to South Street where David gave his occupation as baker and grocer. Also living with them were their three servants. In fact he was also a beer retailer - see beerhouse 92 – South Street (19) - because in Kelly's Directory of 1872 he was listed (albeit as David Langford) as running a beerhouse in South Street. David Langdon died on 01 December 1873 aged 37.

Licensees
1866 – David Langdon – Beer Retailer (Kelly's 1866 Directory)


 

 

103 – Wine Street (1) - Case is Altered

This was the Case is Altered in Wine Street. Charles Legg, a Town Watchman, was dismissed for drinking here while on duty in 1842. By 1851 the licensee, Charles Pottle, a builder and innkeeper, was running the Oxford Inn.

Licensees
1842 – Charles Pottle ran a beerhouse in Wine Street


 

 

104 – Wine Street (2) - The Running Horse

1843 – No licensees known but a fatal fight at this beerhouse, called the Running Horse, gave it some notoriety.


 

ADDENDA

 

105 – Goar Knap

1870 – "George Connick, keeper of a beerhouse at Goar Knap, was summoned for keeping his house open for the sale of intoxicating liquors on Sunday 21 August. PC Saunders proved the case. Fined 20s and costs, and cautioned." Borough Petty Sessions.

 

106 – Preston

1875 – Tabitha Curtis, beerseller of Preston was fined for unmarked and deficient cups. Reporting on the County Petty Sessions in its edition of 7 May 1875, the Western Gazette noted "Mr Smith found three quart and three pint cups unstamped and deficient. Defendant said she "had been taken in" as she bought the cups from the former landlord. Fined £1 and 7s 6d costs."

 

107 – Kiddles Lane

1869 – George Armstrong. At the September 1869 County Petty Sessions all license applications in the district were renewed "with the exception of a beerhouse in Kiddles Lane (today's Eastland Road), kept by Mr George Armstrong, which was struck off the list, becuase it was not properly rated."